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Unprecedented drought reveals 7500-year-old Spanish Stonehenge

Ancient artifacts are rising up from the depths.

spanish stonehenge

Dolmen Guadalperal Verano , seen in 2019.

Just as multiple pyramids are scattered across the continents, another wonder of the world has found its duplicate.

Behold: Spanish Stonehenge.

The megalithic structure located in the Valdecañas reservoir of Spain owes its reemergence to Europe’s severe drought continuing to drastically reduce water levels. However, this is not its first surprise appearance.

The Dolmen of Guadalperal (the site’s official name) was first discovered in 1926 by German archaeologist Hugo Obermaier. According to Reuters, Obermaier’s find was deliberately flooded for a rural development project nearly 40 years later. Since then it has peaked up from its watery grave a total of four times. It last reappeared during another time of drought in 2019.

Like its Celtic predecessor, the origins of Spanish Stonehenge are shrouded in mystery.


As a video from Good Morning America explains below, the formation of 150 standing stones dates back to 3000 BC, though its creators are unknown. What it was used for is anyone’s guess—some theories suggest it was a sacred tomb, others claim it to be a solar temple.

As Europe endures months of its worst drought in 500 years, other bygone relics have risen up from the water’s descending surface. On Aug 19, Reuters reported that 20 sunken Nazi warships from World War II were visible along the Danube River in Serbia. An ancient bridge not seen since the 1950s also reemerged in Yorkshire, England.

Of course, Europe isn’t the only area being affected. The same month, a buddhist statue thought to be 600 years old appeared in China’s dwindling Yangtze River. Even Texas’ Dinosaur Valley State Park uncovered rare dinosaur tracks previously hidden beneath layers of water and sediment.

While it’s fun marveling at the historical spectacle, hopefully these discoveries from the past can also serve as warnings for the future in an effort to help limit climate change. Even the greatest stone monuments can be rebuilt. The same cannot necessarily be said for our planet.

When people move in and refuse to move out, what do you do?

Squatters' rights laws are some of the most bizarrely misused legal realities we have, and something no one seems to have a good answer for. Most of us have heard stories of someone moving into a vacant home and just living there, without anyone's permission and without paying rent, and somehow this is a legal question mark until the courts sort it out.

According to The National Desk, squatters' rights are a carryover from British property law and were created to ensure that abandoned property could be used and to protect occupants from being kicked out without proper notice. It should go without saying that squatter law isn't meant to allow someone to just take over someone else's property, but sometimes that's exactly what happens.

It's what happend to Flash Shelton's mother when she put her house up for rent after her husband passed away. A woman contacted her with interest in the property, only she wanted to do repairs and look after the home instead of paying rent. Before anyone knew it, she had furniture delivered (which she later said was accidental) and set up camp, despite Shelton's mom not agreeing to the arrangement.

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Joy

Flight attendant reveals the two surefire ways to get a first-class upgrade

You must think like a flight attendant, not a passenger.

A flight attendant sits in first class.

How are some people able to upgrade from economy to first class on a commercial air flight? A flight attendant who goes by the name of Cierra Mistt on TikTok recently shared the secrets in a viral video.

According to the Salt Lake City-based flight attendant, there are two ways to get into first class for free. One tactic is for overbooked flights, and the other is for flights with a lot of empty seats.

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Democracy

This Map Reveals The True Value Of $100 In Each State

Your purchasing power can swing by 30% from state to state.

Image by Tax Foundation.

Map represents the value of 100 dollars.

As the cost of living in large cities continues to rise, more and more people are realizing that the value of a dollar in the United States is a very relative concept. For decades, cost of living indices have sought to address and benchmark the inconsistencies in what money will buy, but they are often so specific as to prevent a holistic picture or the ability to "browse" the data based on geographic location.

The Tax Foundation addressed many of these shortcomings using the most recent (2015) Bureau of Economic Analysis data to provide a familiar map of the United States overlaid with the relative value of what $100 is "worth" in each state. Granted, going state-by-state still introduces a fair amount of "smoothing" into the process — $100 will go farther in Los Angeles than in Fresno, for instance — but it does provide insight into where the value lies.

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Family

Younger generations are torn over inheriting boomer heirlooms. Here are 4 helpful tips.

The generational divide on this front is a big one, but there are better and worse ways to navigate it.

There are kind and gentle ways to handle hand-me-downs.

As the baby boomer generation reaches their "golden years," many of them are starting to think about what to do with their earthly possessions, much to the chagrin of some of their Gen X, millennial and Gen Z descendants.

How many of us really want to take over our grandma's collection of dolls or plates when we have no interest in collecting ourselves? How many people have homes filled with furniture we actually like, only to be offered antiques and heirlooms that we have neither the desire nor room for? What about china sets, artwork and other things our elders have loved that they want to see passed down in the family that no one in the family really wants?

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via TED

Comedian Pardis Parker at the Global Ted COnference 2022.

In April 2022, comedian Pardis Parker performed a five-minute set at the global TED Conference in Vancouver, Canada, where he admitted he’s “terrified of wanting to be a billionaire.” The performance was a funny and bold, statement in a culture obsessed with the ultra-wealthy.

Parker’s fear of becoming a billionaire began after he left Canada for Los Angeles. “I think the biggest difference between Canada and L.A. is the extent to which people in L.A. fetishize wealth,” Parker said.

“I'm terrified, man. I'm terrified that L.A. is changing me that I'm becoming one of those people who chases money, who fetishizes wealth who wants to be a billionaire,” he continued. “When I say that people get angry they get defensive. They’re like, ‘What's wrong with being rich? What's wrong with being a billionaire? What's wrong with being financially savvy?’ It's just like yo man, if you own a billion of anything that doesn't make you savvy, that makes you a hoarder.

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@katiebrookenewton/TikTok

Best doorbell camera footage ever.

Doorbell cameras offer us candid glimpses into the best and worst parts of humanity. Everything from package theft to funny off-the-cuff-rants to sagely life advice has been captured and shared to remind us that life is indeed neither fully good nor bad.

Luckily, this doorbell cam story definitely falls into the heartwarming, feel-good category.

A compilation video posted to TikTok by a woman named Katie Brooke Newton shows her neighbors offering cute pregnancy updates every time they pass by her apartment. And, as one viewer aptly noted, it gives perfect “This is Us” vibes.

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