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spanish stonehenge

Dolmen Guadalperal Verano , seen in 2019.

Just as multiple pyramids are scattered across the continents, another wonder of the world has found its duplicate.

Behold: Spanish Stonehenge.

The megalithic structure located in the Valdecañas reservoir of Spain owes its reemergence to Europe’s severe drought continuing to drastically reduce water levels. However, this is not its first surprise appearance.

The Dolmen of Guadalperal (the site’s official name) was first discovered in 1926 by German archaeologist Hugo Obermaier. According to Reuters, Obermaier’s find was deliberately flooded for a rural development project nearly 40 years later. Since then it has peaked up from its watery grave a total of four times. It last reappeared during another time of drought in 2019.

Like its Celtic predecessor, the origins of Spanish Stonehenge are shrouded in mystery.


As a video from Good Morning America explains below, the formation of 150 standing stones dates back to 3000 BC, though its creators are unknown. What it was used for is anyone’s guess—some theories suggest it was a sacred tomb, others claim it to be a solar temple.

As Europe endures months of its worst drought in 500 years, other bygone relics have risen up from the water’s descending surface. On Aug 19, Reuters reported that 20 sunken Nazi warships from World War II were visible along the Danube River in Serbia. An ancient bridge not seen since the 1950s also reemerged in Yorkshire, England.

Of course, Europe isn’t the only area being affected. The same month, a buddhist statue thought to be 600 years old appeared in China’s dwindling Yangtze River. Even Texas’ Dinosaur Valley State Park uncovered rare dinosaur tracks previously hidden beneath layers of water and sediment.

While it’s fun marveling at the historical spectacle, hopefully these discoveries from the past can also serve as warnings for the future in an effort to help limit climate change. Even the greatest stone monuments can be rebuilt. The same cannot necessarily be said for our planet.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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