Editorial Staff
Gabriel Reilich, Editorial Director
Eric Pfeiffer, Deputy Editorial Director
Annie Reneau, Associate Editor
Kiron Chakraborty, Director of Video
Tatiana Cárdenas-Mejía, Designer

We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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