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via NASA

Setiment in Louisiana


NASA satellites continually monitor the Earth, snapping photos and sending information to researchers on the ground.

Most of the time, things seem to be more or less the same as they were the day before, but the Earth is actually constantly changing. Sometimes it changes through discrete events, like landslides and floods. Other times, long-term trends, such as climate change, slowly reshape the land in ways that are difficult to see.

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Joy

Neil deGrasse Tyson's touching statement on dogs, joy and mortality is a real tear-jerker

"They are some of the most joyous creatures that live among us."

Neil deGrasse Tyson's heartfelt speech on dogs.

Astrophysicist, best-selling author and People Magazine’s “Sexiest Astrophysicist Alive,” Neil deGrasse Tyson, has made a long career educating people about the universe and helping us make sense of its seemingly infinite mystery.

But in a recent “Dropouts” podcast interview, Tyson focused on a subject closer to home: man’s best friend, the dog. During the interview, he discussed how dogs have an incredible lust for life that may somehow be tied to an understanding that their time on this Earth is far too short.

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Science

A juice company dumped orange peels in a national park. Here's what it looks like now.

12,000 tons of food waste and 21 years later, this forest looks totally different.


In 1997, ecologists Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs approached an orange juice company in Costa Rica with an off-the-wall idea.

In exchange for donating a portion of unspoiled, forested land to the Área de Conservación Guanacaste — a nature preserve in the country's northwest — the park would allow the company to dump its discarded orange peels and pulp, free of charge, in a heavily grazed, largely deforested area nearby.

One year later, one thousand trucks poured into the national park, offloading over 12,000 metric tons of sticky, mealy, orange compost onto the worn-out plot.

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