We know that many families are taking a huge economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic, but images from the San Antonio Food Bank from last week illustrate that fact in a stark way.

On Thursday, more than 10,000 families showed up at various distribution centers around the city to receive some of the food distribution the food bank had planned. About 6,000 families had preregistered online, but nearly double that number showed up. One large distribution site—Traders Village, a flea market on the south side of the city—saw thousands of cars lining up at dawn, with one person having camped out the night before.

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Photo from Dole
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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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