A dying woman left a heartwarming note to her cat’s future owner.

We are sharing this story to celebrate Adopt-a-Cat Month.

via Jerry Butler / Facebook

Every June, the American Humane Society celebrates Adopt-A-Cat Month because it's the time of year when the most kittens are born, and sadly, the highest number find their way to shelters.

The American Humane Society is encouraging people to adopt shelter cats by asking cat owners to share their favorite feline stories, so we're sharing ours.

In May of 2015, a dying woman knew that she would have to give her cat up to a shelter when she passed, because her son's rental didn't allow pets. After she passed, the son surrendered the five-year-old orange cat named Susie to the Montgomery County Animal Services and Adoption Center in Derwood, Maryland, with a note from the cat's later owner.

In the heartbreaking letter, the former owner detailed the quiet life they lived together and told the future owner that Susie was shy, but eventually became a loving companion.


via Montgomery County Animal Services and Adoption Center


via Montgomery County Animal Services and Adoption Center

Here's the letter in full:

Dear friend

Thank you for adopting my friend, Susie. She was one of three cats in a litter.

November 15, 2010, is her approximate birthday. She moved in with me on December 1, 2010.

Until I felt sure she knew where her home was, I kept her in the house.

After she was left out, she disappeared for four days. I thought I would never see her again. On the fourth night we had an unusually loud thunderstorm. There was no rain, just noise.

That morning when I went out to call her, I did not expect to see her, but she came a running. She came in the house with me and has not been willing to go out again unless I go with her.

She became an indoor cat.

Susie is afraid of everyone and everything. It took her six to eight months to realise I am her friend. I have tried for a long time to get her to go outside. She won't do it unless I go with her.

Perhaps if I could go for walks with her she would get used to going outside but I am too unstable to leave my front porch. She will go on the porch as long as I go with her. The best she will do is walk along the garden next to the front porch.

I believe she would follow me if I could go for a walk.

It would be nice if she would make friends with our dog. They get along together but Susie keeps some distance from the dog. I never worry about them when I leave them in the house together.

Susie is unusual but I enjoy her company. She is a good snuggler but she likes to be the boss. She enjoys being petted. She spends much of her time on my bed but always seems to know where I am.

I hope you enjoy Susie as much as I have.

When Susie arrived at the shelter, she was shy and hid from her caretakers. Knowing that it would be tough to find a home for the cat, the shelter made the letter public.

"I'm sure that when she wrote it, she wrote it just to the intent of getting it to the adopter," said Katherine Zenzano, community outreach coordinator of Montgomery County Animal Services and Adoption Center, said according to ABC News. "But we realized Susie was wasn't going anywhere. Some cats are really great at selling themselves and Susie wasn't selling herself."

"If this letter can in any way help Susie, or any other cats in the same situation, we are happy to get it out there because we think it can touch a lot of people," she continued.

Fifty-five days later, a woman who says she has experience with shy cats adopted Susie. "She just felt she had the ability to work with Susie and wanted to give her the home that she needed," Zenzano, told WTOP.


via Montgomery County Animal Services and Adoption Center


Click here to learn more about Adopt-A-Cat Month.

popular

Brace yourselves, folks, because this is almost too friggin' adorable to handle.

A 911 call can be a scary thing, and an emergency call from a dad having chest pains and trouble breathing is no exception. But thankfully, an exchange between that dad's 5-year-old daughter and 911 dispatcher Jason Bonham turned out to be more humor than horror. If you missed hearing the recording that has repeatedly gone viral since 2010, you have to hear it now. It's perfectly timeless.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Image by Brent Connelly from Pixabay and sixthformpoet / Twitter

Twitter user Matt, who goes by the name @SixthFormPoet, shared a dark love story on Twitter that's been read by nearly 600,000 people. It starts in a graveyard and feels like it could be the premise for a Tim Burton film.

While it's hard to verify whether the story is true, Matt insists that it's real, so we'll believe him.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Can the teens do literally anything without being blasted? Apparently not...

Katie Cornetti and Marissa Bordas, two Pittsburgh teens, were involved in a car crash. After taking a sharp turn on a winding road, the car flipped twice, then landed on its side. The girls said later on that they weren't on their phones at the time. The cause of the crash was because the tires on Bordas' car were mounted improperly.

The girls were wearing their seatbelts and were fine, aside from a few bruises. However, they were trapped in the car for about 20 minutes, so to pass the time while they waited for help, they decided to make a TikTok video. They made sure they were totally fine before they started recording.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Approximately 10% of the population is left-handed, and the balance between lefties and righties has been the same for almost 5,000 years. People used to believe that left-handed people were evil or unlucky. The word "sinister" is even derived from the Latin word for "left."

In modern times, the bias against lefties for being different is more benign – spiral notebooks are a torture device, and ink gets on their hands like a scarlet letter. Now, a new study conducted at the University of Oxford and published in Brain is giving left-handers some good news. While left-handers have been struggling with tools meant for right-handers all these years, it turns out, they actually possess superior verbal skills.

Researchers looked at the DNA of 400,000 people in the U.K. from a volunteer bank. Of those 400,000 people, 38,332 were southpaws. Scientists were able to find the differences in genes between lefties and righties, and that these genetic variants resulted in a difference in brain structure, too. "It tells us for the first time that handedness has a genetic component," Gwenaëlle Douaud, joint senior author of the study and a fellow at Oxford's Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, told the BBC.

Keep Reading Show less
popular