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A lot of people are afraid of adopting black cats. Here are 5 adorable ones that you could get.

These adorable pictures will make you want to adopt a black cat ... right meow.

The Black Cat Project started with a kitten named Imogen.

Casey Christopher adopted Imogen from the West Los Angeles animal shelter last December. She fell so in love that she decided to volunteer regularly at the shelter, too.

Then she noticed something sad: Black cats weren't getting adopted as frequently as other cats. There's actual research about this. 13% of Americans think black cats are bad luck and 26% said color matters when deciding which cat to adopt.


So since she's also a photographer, Casey started taking photos of these adorable black balls of kitten fluff.

"With this photo series, I tried to showcase their personalities to counter the belief that black cats are bad luck," she said.

Meet Midnight. All photos provided by Casey and used with permission. Keep scrolling to see more adorableness.

“There are almost always a lot of black cats and kittens available at the West LA animal shelter, and with Halloween coming up, I wanted to do something to promote them," Casey told Upworthy.

"Black cats and kittens tend to take longer to be adopted and it's very sad to see new cats come and go while the black cats are still waiting for forever homes."

Casey's photos, like the cats themselves, definitely stand out.

Take, for example, this photo of Eloise.

Casey says that Eloise is one of her favorite kittens at the LA shelter.

"She is such a cuddle bug and is very friendly," Casey gushes. "I got to name her and she's gorgeous and will be the perfect lap cat for someone."

Or this snapshot of Onyx, another beautiful black cat from the West LA animal shelter.

Casey says that of the 329 cats in city animal shelters in LA, 101 are black (she counted). This can happen for many reasons, one of which is the myth that black cats are bad luck.

Casey also launched this project in hopes of getting other people involved with shelter work.

"I want people to know that they should try to volunteer at their local animal shelter. It's really fun and rewarding and it feels good when you help get a cat adopted," Casey told Upworthy.

Plus, volunteering means you'll have the chance to play with cats like Frank...

... or you can hang out with Marissa.

At some shelters, you can even volunteer to foster young kitties who typically can't be adopted officially until they're eight weeks old.

Thank you, Casey, for showing the world that black cats are feisty, sweet, affectionate, and ready for their forever homes!

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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