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7 adorable dogs that'll convince you to adopt a senior pet.

These precious pooches prove age is just a number.

7 adorable dogs that'll convince you to adopt a senior pet.

Puppies are incredibly, irresistibly cute. No one can argue with that.

But ... they aren't the only dogs out there that need homes.


Image by optictopic/Flickr.

According to Petfinder, senior dogs wait four times longer to get adopted than puppies.

Image by Mariposa Veterinary Wellness Center in Lenex/Flickr.

Don't older dogs deserve "tails" with happy endings too?

Image by Greg Baker/Getty Images.

That's the driving message behind Susie's Senior Dogs, a Facebook page with almost 580,000 followers.

Image by Susie the Dog/Facebook, used with permission.

The precious pooch you see above is Susie, the source of inspiration for Erin O'Sullivan, who founded Susie's Senior Dogs. Erin's fiancé Brandon Stanton (the guy behind Humans of New York) made Susie famous on Instagram sharing amusing pictures of the beloved pup with her 47,000+ followers.

They told me to strike a pose. 🍁 #foliage
A photo posted by Susie The Dog (@susiethedoggie) on

Though Susie went to doggie heaven in April 2016, Susie's Senior Dogs is continuing on its mission to raise awareness for the plight of other overlooked, senior dogs in need of a home.

If you're looking to adopt a senior dog yourself, here are just a few that need loving fur-ever homes:

1. This cutie pie named Rebel is a 9-year-old Cocker Spaniel who reportedly does not live up to his name. He's available for adoption from Old Dog Haven in Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

2. This looker with a big smile on his face is 8 years old and his name is Bear. Old Dog Haven recently re-shared his photo on their Facebook page, as he's still waiting to be adopted at the Vashon Island Pet Protectors in Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

3. Monica Muggles, this 13-year-old dog who's had it a bit rough, still has a lot to give. And who can resist that adorable side-tongue? She's available for adoption through the Multnomah County Animal Services Shelter in Oregon.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

There's also these adorable faces that deserve to make someone happy every day.

4. Meet Addie Tude. She's just over 10 years old and spent the better part of 8 years giving birth to 11 litters of puppies. Now she just wants to find a loving home and relax. She can be adopted through Bulldog Haven Northwest in Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven, used with permission.

5. Then there's Barno. He's a 12-year-old black Lab and he's blind, but he's very eager to please his humans. He's patiently waiting for a loving home in Freeland, Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven, used with permission.

6. Kaya is an 8-year-old beagle who can be "talkative." Her favorite hobbies include sleeping and relaxing. Kaya is in Silverdale, Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

7. Miranda is 8 years old and a fighter, having survived near-starvation on the Appalachian Trail. You can find her at Warwick Valley Humane Society in New York.

Image by Sophie Gamand Photography/Instagram, used with permission.

Older dogs deserve the chance to shower someone with the love they've got for the rest of their lives.

Tina Nabseth, who works at Old Dog Haven, tells Upworthy that senior dogs struggle to find homes because some have health issues and people don't have the time or money to care for them. There's also the attachment factor: People want to adopt pets that will be part of their lives for a long time, and older pets are obviously at a disadvantage there.

"Giving a senior dog a home is so rewarding and these dogs are grateful, you can feel and see it," Tina says.

Older dogs are a great option for people who are looking for mellow companions. According to the Senior Dog Project, the saying about not being able to teach old dogs new tricks is totally bogus too — because older dogs aren't as easily excitable as puppies, they're able to focus and are pretty quick learners.

They're also a good fit for anyone who is concerned about the damage a new puppy might do to their home. Senior dogs are no longer teething, so you don't have to worry about your new pair of shoes or brand new furniture being chewed up.

The love and loyalty of a dog is not something that wanes with age.

Sure an older dog might require different work than a puppy, but the love you get in return makes it all worth it. If you can't that these pooches into your home but still want to help, you can always support shelters that specialize in finding elder dogs a home.

There are many of them out there, including The Grey Muzzle Organization, Forever Loved Pet Sanctuary, Muttville Senior Dog Rescue, Peace of Mind Dog Rescue, Lily's Legacy Senior Dog Sanctuary, Vintage Paws Sanctuary, and Tails of Gray.

If you've got the time and the energy, these old dogs have the unconditional love to give.

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

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"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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