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7 adorable dogs that'll convince you to adopt a senior pet.

These precious pooches prove age is just a number.

7 adorable dogs that'll convince you to adopt a senior pet.

Puppies are incredibly, irresistibly cute. No one can argue with that.

But ... they aren't the only dogs out there that need homes.


Image by optictopic/Flickr.

According to Petfinder, senior dogs wait four times longer to get adopted than puppies.

Image by Mariposa Veterinary Wellness Center in Lenex/Flickr.

Don't older dogs deserve "tails" with happy endings too?

Image by Greg Baker/Getty Images.

That's the driving message behind Susie's Senior Dogs, a Facebook page with almost 580,000 followers.

Image by Susie the Dog/Facebook, used with permission.

The precious pooch you see above is Susie, the source of inspiration for Erin O'Sullivan, who founded Susie's Senior Dogs. Erin's fiancé Brandon Stanton (the guy behind Humans of New York) made Susie famous on Instagram sharing amusing pictures of the beloved pup with her 47,000+ followers.

They told me to strike a pose. 🍁 #foliage
A photo posted by Susie The Dog (@susiethedoggie) on

Though Susie went to doggie heaven in April 2016, Susie's Senior Dogs is continuing on its mission to raise awareness for the plight of other overlooked, senior dogs in need of a home.

If you're looking to adopt a senior dog yourself, here are just a few that need loving fur-ever homes:

1. This cutie pie named Rebel is a 9-year-old Cocker Spaniel who reportedly does not live up to his name. He's available for adoption from Old Dog Haven in Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

2. This looker with a big smile on his face is 8 years old and his name is Bear. Old Dog Haven recently re-shared his photo on their Facebook page, as he's still waiting to be adopted at the Vashon Island Pet Protectors in Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

3. Monica Muggles, this 13-year-old dog who's had it a bit rough, still has a lot to give. And who can resist that adorable side-tongue? She's available for adoption through the Multnomah County Animal Services Shelter in Oregon.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

There's also these adorable faces that deserve to make someone happy every day.

4. Meet Addie Tude. She's just over 10 years old and spent the better part of 8 years giving birth to 11 litters of puppies. Now she just wants to find a loving home and relax. She can be adopted through Bulldog Haven Northwest in Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven, used with permission.

5. Then there's Barno. He's a 12-year-old black Lab and he's blind, but he's very eager to please his humans. He's patiently waiting for a loving home in Freeland, Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven, used with permission.

6. Kaya is an 8-year-old beagle who can be "talkative." Her favorite hobbies include sleeping and relaxing. Kaya is in Silverdale, Washington.

Image by Old Dog Haven/Facebook, used with permission.

7. Miranda is 8 years old and a fighter, having survived near-starvation on the Appalachian Trail. You can find her at Warwick Valley Humane Society in New York.

Image by Sophie Gamand Photography/Instagram, used with permission.

Older dogs deserve the chance to shower someone with the love they've got for the rest of their lives.

Tina Nabseth, who works at Old Dog Haven, tells Upworthy that senior dogs struggle to find homes because some have health issues and people don't have the time or money to care for them. There's also the attachment factor: People want to adopt pets that will be part of their lives for a long time, and older pets are obviously at a disadvantage there.

"Giving a senior dog a home is so rewarding and these dogs are grateful, you can feel and see it," Tina says.

Older dogs are a great option for people who are looking for mellow companions. According to the Senior Dog Project, the saying about not being able to teach old dogs new tricks is totally bogus too — because older dogs aren't as easily excitable as puppies, they're able to focus and are pretty quick learners.

They're also a good fit for anyone who is concerned about the damage a new puppy might do to their home. Senior dogs are no longer teething, so you don't have to worry about your new pair of shoes or brand new furniture being chewed up.

The love and loyalty of a dog is not something that wanes with age.

Sure an older dog might require different work than a puppy, but the love you get in return makes it all worth it. If you can't that these pooches into your home but still want to help, you can always support shelters that specialize in finding elder dogs a home.

There are many of them out there, including The Grey Muzzle Organization, Forever Loved Pet Sanctuary, Muttville Senior Dog Rescue, Peace of Mind Dog Rescue, Lily's Legacy Senior Dog Sanctuary, Vintage Paws Sanctuary, and Tails of Gray.

If you've got the time and the energy, these old dogs have the unconditional love to give.

True

When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!

4-year-old New Zealand boy and police share toys.

Sometimes the adorableness of small children is almost too much to take.

According to the New Zealand Police, a 4-year-old called the country's emergency number to report that he had some toys for them—and that's only the first cute thing to happen in this story.

After calling 111 (the New Zealand equivalent to 911), the preschooler told the "police lady" who answered the call that he had some toys for her. "Come over and see them!" he said to her.

The dispatcher asked where he was, and then the boy's father picked up. He explained that the kids' mother was sick and the boy had made the call while he was attending to the other child. After confirming that there was no emergency—all in a remarkably calm exchange—the call was ended. The whole exchange was so sweet and innocent.

But then it went to another level of wholesome. The dispatcher put out a call to the police units asking if anyone was available to go look at the 4-year-old's toys. And an officer responded in the affirmative as if this were a totally normal occurrence.

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