Gen X may get its wish of seeing Michael Keaton return to his iconic 'Batman' role
via Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Michael Keaton, who famously played Batman in two Tim Burton movies, 1989's "Batman" and 1992's "Batman Returns, is in talks to reprise the role for Warner Bros.' upcoming DC movie "The Flash."

If Keaton makes the deal, he may be in for more than just one film. He could be cast as the Dark Knight in several other D.C.-related film projects.

The idea is that Keaton's older version of Batman would be more of a mentor or guide, like Samuel L. Jackson's Nick Fury in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The news should be especially exciting to people of a certain age group. To put is simply, for Gen X, Michael Keaton is Batman.



Every era and generation has its own heroes that reflect the values and aspirations of the day. Cowboys have always seemed to reflect the times whether it was John Wayne who played the "white hat" good guy in westerns of of the 1940s or Clint Eastwood who played the outlaw in '70s Spaghetti westerns.

James Bond has also evolved with the times. A Baby Boomer will swear by Sean Connery and his mid-century Sinatra-like swagger. Gen Xers may love the high-concept and tongue-in-cheek Roger Moore-era Bond, while Millenials swear by the gritty, serious performances by Daniel Craig.

Batman is a similar character. Boomers' Batman was the campy, colorful TV show from the '60s starring the intentionally stiff Adam West in his gray tights. Millennials swear by Christian Bale, who played a scarier, gravelly-voiced character.

However, wedged in between is the best Batman, at least if you ask any Gen Xer, Michael Keaton. The Tim Burton Batman films staring Keaton were groundbreaking because they created a dark version of Batman that paid tribute to the character's pulp roots.

The films were also a nod to recent comic book versions of the character, "The Dark Knight Returns" and "Batman: The Killing Joke."

These days, it's assumed that modern adaptations of comic books and reboots of old properties will be dark. It's become one of the most boring cliches in Hollywood.

The lets-go-dark fad was never more evident than the most recent cinematic return to Gotham, "The Joker" starring Joaquin Phoenix that mistook grit for substance.

In the '80s, most people associated Batman with the campy '60s television show starring Adam West and superhero films with the Superman blockbusters starring Christopher Reeve.

Tim Burton's 1989 "Batman" was controversial right off the bat with the casting of Michael Keaton who was most famous for his comedic roles in "Mr. Mom," "Gung Ho," and the 1988 Tim Burton hit, "Beetlejuice."

Keaton was suggested for the role by producer Jon Peters who thought he had an "edgy, tormented quality" after seeing him in "Clean and Sober."

In the pre-internet world, the blowback for the casting of Keaton was incredible. Warner Bros. received over 50,000 letters from angry comic book fans who couldn't stomach the idea that Mr. Mom would be playing the Dark Knight.

But when the film came out, Keaton was lauded for his performance.

Hal Hinson from The Washington Post perfectly summed it up saying:

"For Batman purists, Michael Keaton was an upsetting choice, but it's a choice brilliantly redeemed in realization," he wrote. "What Keaton brings to his characterization of both Batman and his millionaire-playboy alter ego, Bruce Wayne, is a quality of coiled concentration, a wary vigilance … This is a true star performance, subtle, authoritative and sexually vibrant."

With his first performance in the Batsuit, Keaton would lay the groundwork for just about all to follow by bringing an intense, brooding quality to both the Batman and Bruce Wayne personas. Since, most film portrayals have been variations on the themes created by Keaton.

"Wayne's eyes are piercing in a way that flashes icebergs of emotion," Joshua Meyer form Slashfilm writes. "Keaton's Batman has a thousand-yard, hard-ass stare that cuts through every other live-action Batman we've seen since."

When asked how he feels about others playing the role, Keaton's answer is short and sweet. "I'm Batman. I'm very secure in that."

And Gen X agrees.

When "bobcat" trended on Twitter this week, no one anticipated the unreal series of events they were about to witness. The bizarre bobcat encounter was captured on a security cam video and...well...you just have to see it. (Read the following description if you want to be prepared, or skip down to the video if you want to be surprised. I promise, it's a wild ride either way.)

In a North Carolina neighborhood that looks like a present-day Pleasantville, a man carries a cup of coffee and a plate of brownies out to his car. "Good mornin!" he calls cheerfully to a neighbor jogging by. As he sets his coffee cup on the hood of the car, he says, "I need to wash my car." Well, shucks. His wife enters the camera frame on the other side of the car.

So far, it's just about the most classic modern Americana scene imaginable. And then...

A horrifying "rrrrawwwww!" Blood-curdling screaming. Running. Panic. The man abandons the brownies, races to his wife's side of the car, then emerges with an animal in his hands. He holds the creature up like Rafiki holding up Simba, then yells in its face, "Oh my god! It's a bobcat! Oh my god!"

Then he hucks the bobcat across the yard with all his might.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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