More

5-year-old saves baby from peril, dressed as Batman. This is not pretend. It really happened.

He is vengeance. He is the night. He is a 5-year-old boy in a Batman costume, and he just saved a little girl's life.

5-year-old saves baby from peril, dressed as Batman. This is not pretend. It really happened.

According to Yahoo! Parenting, it was a scorching July afternoon when John and Caroline Penny went to the Tesco with their 1-year-old granddaughter, Iris Adamski ... and then accidentally locked her in the hot car.

The Pennys called the police, but the toddler was beyond their reach — and thus, beyond their help.

The good officers did what they could, but their only option was to smash open the back window. And even then, there was no one small enough to crawl inside and retrieve the keys or the child.


GIF from "The Dark Knight Returns."

It was then that Batman arrived, like a beacon in the night. Or at least a 5-year-old boy dressed like Batman.

"Yes, father ... I shall become ... a bat." Photo by SWNS, used with permission.

"That morning [Zavi] decided he wanted to be dressed as Batman, I don't know why," Emma Ahmed, the mother of the 5-year-old hero, told The Daily Mail.

Was it fate or some greater power that inspired Zavi to don the mantle of the Dark Knight on that of all days and for his mother to bring him with her to the Tesco at such a fortuitous time?

The Caped Crusader risked life and limb as he crawled his way through broken glass.

Zavi was the only one around small enough to fit through the car's back window, retrieve the keys, and save the trapped damsel in distress.

GIF from "Batman."

It should be known that Zavi's brother, Nadeen, who was dressed as Superman, stood by and did nothing during his brother's remarkable show of bravery.

GIF from "The All-New Super Friends Hour."

In fairness, it should also be known that Nadeen is 2 years old.

With the innocent returned to safety and justice served, the Dark Knight ... went into the Tesco with his mom.

Zavi Ahmed and Iris Adamski. Photo by SWNS, used with permission.

Presumably, Bat-Zavi and Super-Nadeen returned to the Hall of Justice and spent the afternoon gorging on Aero bars, although our sources can neither confirm nor deny this development.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.