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Fashion

Pop Culture

She re-created famous fashion ads to make a great point about diversity

"The next generation can only get inspired and reach for the stars themselves if they believe they can do it too."

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

A classic pose.


From a young age, Deddeh Howard was enthralled by fashion and its role in culture. Unfortunately, she was never really able to see herself in it.

"Something that always bothered me when you see these amazing images [was] that very rarely you ever see a black woman on them," Howard, who grew up in West Africa but now resides in Los Angeles, wrote at her blog, Secret of DD.

"Black girls are almost invisible," she wrote.


So Howard created "Black Mirror," a photo series in which she re-creates famous photos with herself in place of models like Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Gisele Bundchen, and others.

Howard's partner, Raffael Dickreuter, shot the series. As its title suggests, it holds a "black mirror" up to the fashion world. The project's goal is both to make people notice the lack of diversity in the fashion world and to provide inspiration to other non-white models.

Deddeh Howard, Gucci, fashion world, diversity

The shades of Gucci.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

superstar, glasses, education, celebrity, representation

Glasses make you wiser.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Kendall Jenner, Calvin Klein, underwear models, black models

The original sexy.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Of the models featured on the fall 2016 runways, 75% were white. There's a major need for a diversity boost.

Sometimes, that lack of diversity can be downright embarrassing. Earlier this year, one fashion show featured models walking to Beyoncé's "Formation," a song Essence described as a "wholly and undeniable a tribute to Blackness — particularly Black girl power." The problem: The show didn't feature a single non-white model.

ethnicity, equality, Guess fashion

Guess who rides motorcycles.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

David Yourman, high fashion, racial inequality

Classy and feminine.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Louis Vuitton, handbags, upper class,

A bike ride with expensive accessories.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

lingerie, Victoria\u2019s Secret, feminine

The lingerie pose.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Dolce & Gabbana, little black dress, stars

Thinking "Breakfast at Tiffanys” maybe?

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Diversity, representation, and visibility play key roles in shaping ambition and self-acceptance in the real world.

It's important to be able to see yourself in the world, and it's important to know that someone who looks like you can succeed.

"The next generation can only get inspired and reach for the stars themselves if they believe they can do it too," Howard wrote on her blog. "For that reason diversity in ad campaigns is in my opinion much more important than you might think."


This article originally appeared on 12.08.16

Pop Culture

These 10 super-popular and swanky foods from 1924 are still our biggest favorites in 2024

We love baked ham. Our great-great grandparents loved it, too, but theirs had an extra kick.

Jell-O and pineapple upside-down cake.

If someone mentioned Jell-O, deviled eggs, baked ham and Chicken à la King to you and then asked you what era these foods were most popular in, you’d probably guess the '70s.



Turns out you’d be wrong by about half a century. The above foods were among the most popular in the 1920s. That’s right, a whole hundred years ago! When flappers were flapping and people were drinking bathtub gin and ladies were bobbing their hair and drawing lines up the backs of their legs.




Advances in refrigeration, farming, marketing and technology meant that a full century ago, people were eating in a fashion that really isn’t all that different from what we consume today.

But while the foods weren’t that different, the prep was. It’s estimated that in 1920, people spent 44 hours per week on meal preparation and cleanup. Six and a half hours a day!

salad, 1923 salad, mrs. beeton

Ten beautiful salads from 1923.

via Free Public Domain Illustrations by Rawpixel/Wikimedia Commons

Compare that to 2014 when Americans spent an average of just 37 minutes a day (roughly four and a half hours a week) on meal prep. In 2024, one imagines that number has gone down even more given the ubiquity of meal delivery apps.

Read on for some top foods of 1924 compared to 2024.

Here are 10 of the top foods in 1924 that people still love today.

Spinach dip: Popular in speakeasies, this dip made with sour cream, mayonnaise and thawed spinach was affordable, easy to make, and quietly elegant.

Do we eat it today? We do! Fancy people add artichoke.

Inexplicable '70s factor: 5 out of 5 bell bottoms

snacks, pretzels, 20s

Pretzels!

via Couleur/Pixabay

Pretzels: Native to Europe, pretzels were a popular appetizer and bar snack in the 1920s.

Do We Eat Them Today? Yes!

Inexplicable '70s factor: 1 out of 5 feathery Farrah Fawcett hairdos

deviled eggs, mustard, mayonnaise

Deviled eggs

Busra Yaman/Pexels

Deviled eggs: Now a relic of potlucks and the occasional too-hip boutique bar, these eggy treats were hugely popular in 1924 because they were easy to make, customizable, and traveled well.

Do we eat them today? Yes, but they’re certainly less popular than they once were.

Inexplicable 70s factor: 5 out of 5 lava lamps

Clam Chowder: This creamy uber soup has been a staple of American cuisine for over a century.

Do we eat it today? You bet your clamshells we do.

Inexplicable '70s factor: 2 out of 5 sideburns

Baked Ham: in 1924, alcohol would be banned for 9 more years but recipes that called for alcohol were popular, perhaps because of the scarcity. Prohibition-baked ham, which was popular at home and at speakeasies, incorporated whiskey or bourbon.

Do we eat it today? Yes, but it isn’t sought after in the same way it was.

Inexplicable 70s factor: 2 out of 3 Charlie’s Angels


Chicken a la King: Another dish served both at home and at restaurants, Chicken à la King involves a cream sauce over chicken and vegetables. It’s served on top of or alongside rice or pasta. Sometimes sherry or mushrooms are incorporated and sometimes tuna or turkey is used in place of chicken.

Do we eat it today? Occasionally, but it’s hardly on every menu like it once was.

Inexplicable '70s factor: 5 out of 5 disco balls

pineapple upside down cake, cherries, dessert

Pineapple Upside Down Cake

Derrick Luciano/ Pixabay

Pineapple upside-down cake: Combining pineapples, cake ingredients, maraschino cherries and gravity, this delectable confection has remained one of America’s most popular desserts.

Do we eat it today? Yes, but it feels kitschy and retro.

Inexplicable '70s factor: 5 out of 5 Watergate scandals

Jell-O: In 1924 you couldn’t swing a watch chain without hitting Jell-O. It was everywhere: on dessert tables, in recipe books put out by Jell-O themselves, and even served with seafood.

Do we eat it today? Yes! And if you’ve ever found yourself at a frat party, you know a whole cottage industry has sprung up around clever ways to combine it with alcohol.

Inexplicable '70s factor: 8 out of 10 shag carpets


Devil’s food cake: In 1924 they deviled eggs, they deviled ham and they also deviled cake. Supposedly more sinfully indulgent (hence the “devil”) than regular chocolate cake because it’s made with chocolate squares instead of cocoa powder, this was a popular dessert.

Do we eat it today? Yes!

Inexplicable 70s factor: 2 out of 5 Macrame plant holders

For comparison, here are the most popular American food dishes in 2024 as determined by YouGov.

10. Corn on the cob

9. Southern Style Fried Chicken

8. Fried Chicken

7. Steak and Baked Potato

6, Cheeseburger

5 Hashbrowns

4. Grilled Cheese

3. Mashed Potato

2. French Fries

1. Hamburger

True

Music’s biggest night took place Sunday, February 4 with the 66th Annual GRAMMY Awards. Now, fans have the opportunity to take home a piece of the famed event.

Longtime GRAMMY Awards partner Mastercard is using this year’s campaign to shine a light on the environment and the Priceless Planet Coalition (PPC), a forest restoration program with the goal of restoring 100 million trees. Music fans are 1.5 times more likely to take action to help the environment, making the GRAMMY Awards the perfect opportunity to raise awareness.

“Through our GRAMMY Awards campaign, we’ve created an opportunity for our brand, our partners and consumers to come together over shared values, to participate during a moment when we can celebrate our passion for music and our commitment to make meaningful investments to preserve the environment,” says Rustom Dastoor, Executive Vice President of Marketing and Communications, North America at Mastercard.

The campaign kicked off with an inspired self-guided multi-sensory tour at the GRAMMY House presented by Mastercard, where people journeyed through their passion of music and educational experience about Mastercard’s longstanding commitment to tree restoration. Then, this year’s most-nominated GRAMMY artist and a passionate voice for the environment, SZA, led the charge with the debut performance of her new song, Saturn.

Mastercard’s partners are also joining the mission by encouraging people all over the country to participate; Lyft and Sirius XM are both offering ways for consumers to get involved in the Priceless Planet Coalition. To learn more about how you can support these efforts, visit mastercard.com/forceofnature.

While fashion is always a highlight of any GRAMMY Awards event, SZA’s outfit worn during her performance of Saturn was designed to make a statement; made of tree seeds to help spread awareness. Fans can even comment ‘🌱’ and tag a friend on Mastercard’s designated post of SZA’s GRAMMY House performance for a chance to win a tree seed from the performance outfit*.

“SZA has a personal passion for sustainability – not just in forest restoration but in the clothes she wears and the platforms and partners she aligns herself with. It was important to us to partner with someone who is not only showing up big at the GRAMMY Awards – as the most GRAMMY-nominated artist this year – but also showing up big for the environment,” says Dastoor.


Due to factors like factory farming, logging, and urban growth, the Earth is losing trees at an alarming rate. According to Earth.org, approximately 10 million hectares of trees are lost each year.

Forests regulate the air we breathe and are highly effective in moderating greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, tropical forests provide up to 30% of the global action needed to stop climate change.

"Planting trees can help improve everything – from air quality to economic opportunity to mental health – and everybody deserves these benefits,” SZA said in a press release about her previous environmental activism.

Guided by Conservation International and World Resources Institute, the PPC employs science-based best practices for the selection, implementation, and long-term monitoring of their restoration efforts.

In addition to their goal to restore 100 million trees, the PPC also works to regrow forests in geographies that represent the greatest global need. This includes areas with the greatest potential for positive impacts on climate, with community and biodiversity goals being prioritized as they set out to restore forestland across the globe.

To learn more about the Priceless Planet Coalition or how you could get involved in forest restoration, visit mastercard.com/forceofnature.

* Additional Sweepstakes Details: No Purch. Nec. Void in Quebec and where prohibited. Mastercard cardholders before 2/4/24, who are U.S. & Canada res 18+ at time/date of entry. Ends 2/10/24. Winners/ARV: $30 USD each. Entry must include a “seedling” emoji and tag a friend. Canadian winners must answer a time-limited skill-testing math question. Odds of winning depend on the total number of entries received. Rules: priceless.com/forceofnature

2023 is all about maximalist Christmas.

Every era has its own taste in interior decor, and the typical post-Millenium American home is saturated in grays and beige, or “Greige,” as the vibe is known. It’s a far cry from the flashiness of the late ‘60s and ‘70s, the Brownpolcalype that was the ‘80s, or the hunter green-hued ‘90s.

The current trend in minimalist decor, even during the holiday season, rubbed TikTokker Ave the wrong way, and she’s fighting back with an audacious display that recalls a world before farmhouse chic was a thing.


“I have decided that I will not be participating in ‘Minimalist Beige Christmas’ this year,” TikTok user Ave says while showing a picture of some very beige, very sparse holiday decor. “If this is what you like, if this is what you want, good for you, do it, enjoy the hell out of it. It's not for me. I think this is pretty, I think it's simple, I don't think it's giving enough. Not for me.”

@aver.deedle

I usually dont decorate until after thanksgiving but I might change that this year #christmasdecor #nostalgicchristmas #colorfulchristmas #maximalist #maximalistchristmas #nostalgia #interview #fyp #greenscreen #christmaslights

Ave wants to embrace the history and playfulness of the holiday by making her home a place where nostalgia trumps taste.

“The theme this year is nostalgic early 2000s Christmas. I want all the rainbow lights. I want the mismatched ornaments. I want the random wrapping paper. I want nostalgia,” she says. She wants her home to look like someone lives there on Christmas, not a “Crate & Barrel showroom.”

People in the comments feel she totally read the room regarding the vibe of Christmas 2023. “I loved the minimalist Christmas until I had kids, now I want to make sure they experience the Christmas magic I did growing up,” Makayla wrote. “The theme is to try to feel something this year,” NikandTorrie added.