From Craig's List to OfferUp to Facebook Marketplace, people love buying and selling their stuff online. But where and how to safely exchange goods and money with strangers from the internet is always a question. Many people don't feel comfortable giving out their home address or going to someone else's house. It's become commonplace to meet in a public place, but even that isn't always as safe as it sounds.

After an armed robbery took place in a retail parking lot during and online sale exchange in Kennewick, Washington, the police department announced their solution to making such transactions safer. They have designated spots in their own parking lot, complete with security cameras, for people in the community to meet up for online purchases.

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Cities

Twitter can be a remarkable tool.

The ability to instantly send a message to your favorite athlete, a movie star, or even the president of the United States still seems like something out of a sci-fi novel. The platform's ubiquity also means you may even get responses from the famous people you reach out to. That's a good thing, right? As we're learning with each passing day, maybe it's not.

When a science writer tweeted criticism of billionaire Elon Musk, she got a personal response from him — and many of his followers.

Writing for The Daily Beast, Erin Biba recounted what happened when she addressed Musk's recent anti-media tirades and his criticism of nanotechnologist Upulie Divisekera being "100% synonymous with BS" on account of her job title.

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Family

Goodness, have our views on the internet changed!

When I first got dial-up, I was 14, it was 1998, and AOL was all about taking over the world (if not with connectivity then at least with the 700 CDs they sent to your house each month). My parents had two rules: Don't tie up the phone lines (broken immediately), and never meet someone from online that you don't already know.

Years later, as an adult with a cable modem, their advice seems pretty dated. In fact, society's gone from never meeting strangers online to doing all our dating on Tinder and asking people we've never known to give us rides from one place to another. Our only requirements? That they be nearby and have at least a 4.7 driver rating. (This is only for adults, though! Don't let your kids meet strangers from Minecraft!)

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Being a smart and caring parent in the age of the internet is complicated.

Most of us who are parenting school-aged kids today didn't grow up with the internet. Cyberbullying didn't happen to us. Porn at the push of a button didn't exist for us. Social media wasn't a thing we had to figure out until we were well into adulthood.

Still, when Anastasia Basil's 10-year-old daughter asked if she could get the app Musical.ly so she could make fun lip sync videos on her phone, Basil told her she had to check it out first, just in case.

Basil dove in headfirst and what she found was a dark and disturbing reminder of what children can trip into on the internet. She'd recently read Nancy Jo Sales' "American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers" and followed Sales' advice to explore the app like a kid would, not like a mildly interested, impatient adult.

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