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She re-created famous fashion ads to make a great point about diversity

"The next generation can only get inspired and reach for the stars themselves if they believe they can do it too."

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

A classic pose.


From a young age, Deddeh Howard was enthralled by fashion and its role in culture. Unfortunately, she was never really able to see herself in it.

"Something that always bothered me when you see these amazing images [was] that very rarely you ever see a black woman on them," Howard, who grew up in West Africa but now resides in Los Angeles, wrote at her blog, Secret of DD.

"Black girls are almost invisible," she wrote.


So Howard created "Black Mirror," a photo series in which she re-creates famous photos with herself in place of models like Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Gisele Bundchen, and others.

Howard's partner, Raffael Dickreuter, shot the series. As its title suggests, it holds a "black mirror" up to the fashion world. The project's goal is both to make people notice the lack of diversity in the fashion world and to provide inspiration to other non-white models.

Deddeh Howard, Gucci, fashion world, diversity

The shades of Gucci.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

superstar, glasses, education, celebrity, representation

Glasses make you wiser.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Kendall Jenner, Calvin Klein, underwear models, black models

The original sexy.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Of the models featured on the fall 2016 runways, 75% were white. There's a major need for a diversity boost.

Sometimes, that lack of diversity can be downright embarrassing. Earlier this year, one fashion show featured models walking to Beyoncé's "Formation," a song Essence described as a "wholly and undeniable a tribute to Blackness — particularly Black girl power." The problem: The show didn't feature a single non-white model.

ethnicity, equality, Guess fashion

Guess who rides motorcycles.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

David Yourman, high fashion, racial inequality

Classy and feminine.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Louis Vuitton, handbags, upper class,

A bike ride with expensive accessories.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

lingerie, Victoria\u2019s Secret, feminine

The lingerie pose.

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Dolce & Gabbana, little black dress, stars

Thinking "Breakfast at Tiffanys” maybe?

All photos by Raffael Dickreuter, used with permission.

Diversity, representation, and visibility play key roles in shaping ambition and self-acceptance in the real world.

It's important to be able to see yourself in the world, and it's important to know that someone who looks like you can succeed.

"The next generation can only get inspired and reach for the stars themselves if they believe they can do it too," Howard wrote on her blog. "For that reason diversity in ad campaigns is in my opinion much more important than you might think."


This article originally appeared on 12.08.16

The scarf, a simple accessory that some find an essential fashion piece. Both fashionable and function with the warmth they provide, scarves can be a valuable gift for any occasion or person. Here, we've selected our best selling scarves from our store. At Upworthy Market, when you purchase a product, you directly support the artisans who craft their own products, so with every purchase, you're doing good. These scarves are not only unique, but they are hand-made by local artisans and all under $30.

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Decorated with fantastic hues of pink, purple, and blue, this impressive wrap scarf from Thailand features an original design by Vinita. The skilled artisan hand-weaves the scarf of cotton, applying the colors with the traditional tie-dye technique. Dainty fringes complete the scarf at each end.

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6. Blue Cotton Hand Woven Scarf

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7. Men's Artisan Crafted Woven Brown Alpaca Blend Scarf

Celinda Jaco selects a cozy blend of Andean alpaca for this handsome men's scarf. Classic in style, it features fine stripes of ivory and camel woven through the chestnut brown textile. Hand-tied fringe completes a distinguished design.

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8. Artisan Crafted Woven Black Alpaca Blend Scarf

Celinda Jaco selects a cozy blend of Andean alpaca for this handsome men's scarf. Classic in style, it features fine stripes of white and gunmetal grey woven through the midnight-black textile. Hand-tied fringe completes a distinguished design.

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Model Lila Moss at Milan Fashion Week.

Kids with diabetes often deal with their disease behind the scenes, discreetly checking their blood sugar and giving themselves insulin so as not to draw unwanted attention to themselves.

Lila Moss is going in another direction, one that brings diabetes into the spotlight—literally. While walking the runway at Fendi and Versace's show during Milan Fashion Week, Moss—the 19-year-old daughter of British supermodel Kate Moss—wore a legless bodysuit that allowed her insulin pump attached to her upper thigh to show fully.

The pump allows Moss, who has type 1 diabetes, to give herself life-saving insulin without having to puncture her skin with a needle each time. Such pumps have been a welcome development for people with diabetes, who normally have to inject themselves with insulin several times a day.


Though she didn't mention the pump (which is also called a "pod") in her Instagram caption, Moss' photo prompted a flood of positive responses from people in the diabetes community. Such high-profile representation is rare, as is such an unapologetic visual of what living with diabetes looks like.

"Thank you for wearing your insulin pump so proudly 💙💪🏻," wrote one commenter.

"T1D🙌 love your pod and the example you lead! 💙" wrote another.

"As a fellow T1 diabetic (and ex model), THANK YOU for wearing your device on the freaking runway! You are a queen and I want these pics everywhere cos the more we share of T1 diabetes the better 🙌," wrote a third.

Over and over, commenters shared their gratitude and joy at seeing Moss wear her insulin pump so proudly:

"Thank you for not hiding your diabetes!! You are gorgeous!! :)"

"Absolutely love that you don't hide your pod, you're an inspiration to so many living with T1 diabetes ❤️."

"You are truly so inspiring thanks for showing the world you can do anything and more even when you have type 1 diabetes. (from a mother with a son with the same Illness)."

"Few things make me want to cry but wearing the pod so proudly on your leg👏-I love it! I wear mine proudly on my arm."

"I think not many people know that I have diabetes," Moss told The Kit last August. "It's not visible from the outside, so no one would really know just by looking at you. I have type 1."

According to the Mayo Clinic, type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone that allows our bodies to process sugar. The cause is unknown, but genetics and some viruses may contribute to the disease, which usually appears in childhood or adolescence. No one has found a cure yet, so people with type 1 diabetes control the disease through blood sugar monitoring and insulin injections.

Type 1 diabetes is a difficult disease, especially for kids, as it requires constant diligence. It's also a disease that can be hard for others to understand or relate to. Seeing someone like Lila Moss embracing her pump and not shying away from letting the world know about it is undoubtedly inspiring for other young people with type 1 diabetes. It's especially impressive that she made such a strong statement on the catwalk at one of the world's most prestigious fashion shows, where bodies and beauty are showcased and celebrated.

Diabetes doesn't make anyone any less beautiful or less able to do their job. That message came through loud and clear, without Lila Moss having to say a word.

via The Root

The pandemic has had a big effect on the country's fashion habits. It's drastically reduced the number of people going out at night and 42% now work full-time from home. The change has been so drastic that one in six dry cleaners has gone out of business during the pandemic.

The COVID-19 era proves that if people don't have to dress up, they don't.

That's why La Verne Ford Wimberly of Tulsa, Oklahoma is such an inspiration.


She's a parishioner at Metropolitan Baptist Church and when Sunday services went online last March, it didn't stop her from dressing to the nines. For 53 Sundays in a row she has dressed in a color-coordinated outfit and, after service, posted a photo of it on Facebook.

"She never skips a beat with the hats, the clothes, and all that beautiful jewelry," Robin Watkins, 54, the church's executive office assistant, told The Washington Post.

Wimberly was always known for her head-turning outfits at Sunday service.

"In the 20 years I've been going to church there, I've always had my little routine that I learned from my mother as a girl," she said. "I'd pick out a nice outfit and hat and lay it out the night before, so that I could be prepared and look presentable."

When COVID hit, she decided wasn't going to let it change how she presents herself to the world.

"I thought, 'Oh, my goodness, I can't sit here looking slouchy in my robe,' " she said. "I didn't want to sit around alone and feel sorry for myself, so I decided, 'You know what? I'm going to dress up anyway.' "

On her first day of virtual church, she got up early to style her hair and put on some lipstick. She then put on her favorite white dress and a sheer ruffled hat. She even put on matching shoes, a detail no one would notice over Zoom.

After she posted a photo on Facebook she was flooded with compliments.

Wimblery has written down her outfits on a calendar so she never repeats the same one twice. The most dramatic piece of her wardrobe has to be her hats and she has plenty of them. "It's safe to say that 50 is a good number for the hats," she confessed.

Her love of fashion was inspired by a school teacher she had growing up. So when she joined the profession after college, she decided to carry on the tradition.

"They'd rub my arm and say, 'Oh, Miss Ford [her maiden name], you look so pretty,' " she recalled. "Pretty soon, I had so many clothes that I started a rotation and color-coding system, so I could keep surprising the kids with my outfits."

Wimberly is known by her fellow parishioners as "Doctor" because she has a doctorate in education. She would go on to be a principal and then a superintendent.

However, from the looks of it, she could have easily made it in the world of fashion, too.

Fashion psychologist Rose Turner from London College says that dressing up even though we don't have to is great self-care during a pandemic.

"When other activities that help us to feel 'like us' – such as hobbies, seeing friends and going to work – are unavailable, getting dressed up may help people to reinforce their sense of self," Turner told the BBC.

"Clothing impacts how people think and behave. Putting on a 'work' outfit might help with motivation and concentration, and wearing something special might help to break the monotony of lockdown, and lift people's mood," she added.

Wimbley's story is a great lesson for everyone to remember. Just because times are hard, doesn't mean you have to look like it.