+
A PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM UPWORTHY
We are a small, independent media company on a mission to share the best of humanity with the world.
If you think the work we do matters, pre-ordering a copy of our first book would make a huge difference in helping us succeed.
GOOD PEOPLE Book
upworthy

Business

A salesman selling a car to a skeptical woman.

It can be intimidating to be approached by a salesperson when making a big purchase, such as a car or an appliance. They can swoop in like sharks, seeing blood in the water and some refuse to leave you alone, even if you say, “I’m just looking.”

TikTok's @RussFlipsWhips is a car salesman who went viral with a video explaining why “I’m just looking” doesn’t work on a car lot and providing more effective phrases you can use instead.

"There's two main reasons, and here's what you should say instead of 'I'm just looking,'" he said in a video with over 345,000 views. “One is, we hear it every single day. So when somebody tells me, ‘I’m just looking,’ I’m so used to hearing that, I almost like brush it off and ignore it because I’m like, ‘That’s what the customer’s supposed to say.’ “Secondly, every car salesman has had a customer say, ‘I’m just looking,’ and we ended up selling them a car."



Instead, Russell suggests you say: "Hey, I’d really like to look alone. Can I please have your business card?" or “I’m really not in the market for a car.”


@russflipswhips

Replying to @SoyPablo This is what I would say #carsales #carsalesman #cardealership #carbuyingtips

The post received funny responses from folks who may not qualify for a loan. “The ‘I have 2 repos and no money down' line works wonders,’” one TikToker joked. “I just tell them my credit score and they run,” another added.

In the end, Russell’s suggestions show that sometimes, the best way to get our point across is to be direct and honest. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to shop alone and if the salesperson can respect that request, they deserve the sale if you decide to buy something.

Business

Study shows the specific barriers female business owners face—even those at the very top

30 women who own businesses that make more than $5 million in annual revenues, and the discussions were very revealing.

Canva

Running multi-million dollar businesses doesn't exclude women from gender prejudice.

Many studies on the state of women in the workplace seem to reinforce the doom and gloom of modern women's experience. They tell us something we already know – that you're going to have to speak ten times louder to be heard half as often, and there's no amount of leaning in or wearing shoulder pads that can fix that.

A report conducted in 2019 by Babson College and Bank of America found that female business owners don't feel like they're being taken seriously, which is pretty much old news at this point. But the report also explored the specific barriers women business owners feel like they're facing so we can jump over those barriers, no shoulder pads needed.


Researchers conducted in-depth interviews with 30 women who own businesses that make more than $5 million in annual revenues, and the discussions were very revealing. "[W]omen who have built successful companies had to navigate significant gender-based obstacles. In doing so, these women created alternate paths to success for themselves, and for other similarly unstoppable female entrepreneurs," Bank of America said in a release. The study found that there were three main misconceptions: market misperceptions, network exclusions, and managing expectations while underfunded.

Many women felt that they "had their leadership position questioned due to their gender." Raegan Moya-Jones, co-founder of baby products manufacturer Aden & Anais, said the fact that she was a mother was a positive in the eyes of the consumer, however she found that business people weren't taking her seriously because of it.

Other female business owners found that some people had misconceptions as to why the woman founded her business in the first place. "When a woman starts a business, some potential backers may assume that she is running the business out of her home, for fun, or just to supplement her family's income," the report said. "Backers may then fail to see the business as growth-oriented and worthy of investment."

women, business, successful, entrepreneur, trends

Potential backers may assume that a woman could only run a business from her home.

Photo from Pixabay

More importantly, the report laid out how women can bust through the barriers to success. The report recommended we "capitalize on personal insights and experiences," because the female experience is actually an advantage. "Women entrepreneurs have an opportunity to leverage their personal experiences and serve the emerging needs and trends for female consumers," the report said. "Because they understand the market, they are well suited to communicate their value proposition and reach their target clients." In other words, being a woman isn't something that has to hold you back — it can propel you forward.

This article originally appeared on 10.24.19



From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web
True

As AI makes daily headlines (and robots take over), I’ve been thinking more about the future of human work and the value of craftsmanship. Craftsmanship, the human trait that enables us to care for and love the work we produce, especially in the built environment.

Even as we make advancements and increase efficiencies in technology, the built world desperately needs more people who care about craft and want to work with their hands.

In construction specifically, the demand for housing—especially affordable housing—and safer roads and bridges is only increasing. And over 40% of skilled workers will retire in the next 10 years. We need new craftspeople more than ever. And, fast.
That’s why we started MT Copeland: to capture the craftsmanship seen in the built world around us (our homes, our workplaces, our cities), and help anyone learn directly from experienced professionals. We help craftspeople teach the skills they use on the job every day, and inspire others to make a career move into skilled careers. Carpenters, entrepreneurs building homes, painters, and even first-time homeowners can now use methods from generations past to make projects better.

The attention to detail in drywall, painting, or cabinet making requires a unique combination of technical prowess, problem-solving abilities, and an artistic eye. It’s the kind of work made only possible by human touch. Just when it starts to feel like everything’s destined to be automated, remember: some things simply must be made by human hands.


For a long time in America, the cultural perception of skilled workers has been that they’re working “worse jobs” than people in offices. But, the average plumber makes over $60,000 a year. Experienced plumbers double that. And if you want to own your own plumbing company, the sky’s the limit.

A skill like plumbing can be taught (and without an advanced degree! Or college debt!) but we need to pass down both the knowledge, and the spirit of excellence. That’s what we’re excited to be working on at MT Copeland: helping our next generation continue to build something real.

To try MT Copeland, visit www.mtcopeland.com.

Courtesy of Fresh Cravings

Fresh Cravings Salsa has donated $250,000 to 50 grassroots non-profits with a focus on youth-led initiatives.

True

There's no question that we live in challenging times. But along with challenges come opportunities for change—and for changemakers to rise up.

When the world feels dark, we naturally crave the light. We look for torches of goodness, people who create and shed light on positive change in their communities and in society, as a whole. Sometimes we find these wonderful humans in the most unlikely of places—for instance, in the "Salsabrations" of a beloved snacking brand known for chilled salsas and hummus dips.

Family-owned Fresh Cravings says that its motto, "Crave Goodness," is about inspiring people to seek the best for themselves, their friends and family and their communities. It’s not just lip service; the company puts its money where its mouth is, giving back to the communities it serves. In 2021, Fresh Cravings launched a national giveback campaign to "Salsabrate™ The Good" by donating $5,000 a week—$250,000 total—to 50 grassroots, non-profit organizations with an emphasis on youth change-makers. And it's continuing its commitment to amplify and support the good in 2022.


Upworthy is thrilled to partner with Fresh Cravings in sharing these youth-led initiatives and celebrating the unsung heroes who are being lifted up in this campaign. Check out these young folks and the awesome things they're doing for their communities:

1/9

Jahkil Jackson was just 8 years old when he decided he wanted to do something to help people experiencing homelessness in his hometown of Chicago. He started creating and giving out Blessing Bags filled with basic supplies such as toothbrushes, soap, hand sanitizer, socks and more. Five years later, he has an entire team of volunteers nationwide who build and distribute Blessing Bags through his non-profit Project I AM. "My goal with the organization is not only to help the homeless and build awareness," says Jahkil. "It's also to show kids that helping others, being involved in their community and doing good in the world is actually cool."

To learn more about Project I AM or to support Jahkil's efforts, please visit: https://officialprojectiam.com

There are amazing initiatives all around us that we may not see that deserve to be recognized. Supporting those who are already enacting positive change in their communities—especially young people who represent the future of humanity—is one of the best ways companies and individuals can make an impact on our world.

To learn more about the other organizations Fresh Cravings is lifting up and to be part of this ongoing festival of compassion and charity, join the Salsabration and sign up for the Fresh Cravings newsletter. We can all make our world a better place by amplifying goodness and taking inspiration from the beacons of light in our communities.