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The New York City subways can be miserable, but one Brooklyn-bound L train became a lot more festive when a pop-up Thanksgiving feast appeared onboard. It was like Friendsgiving, but the friends were strangers that you'd fight for a seat if it ever came down to it. It's nice to be reminded that New Yorkers can display a strong sense of community when the occasion presents itself.

A table with a full Thanksgiving feast was set up in the middle of the car. Collard greens, mashed potatoes, homemade mac and cheese, cider, stuffing, and of course, turkey, were available to everyone riding the car. The table was even draped with a table cloth, making this subway Thanksgiving dinner a classy affair. After a prayer, everyone on the train was allowed to eat. All in all, about 40 people were fed on the train.

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Justin Rosenthal

Over the summer, the West Side of Manhattan sat in darkness, but the blackout didn't slow down the city that never sleeps. The casts of multiple Broadway shows sang in the streets, and one couple even got hitched.

The blackout interrupted the wedding of couple Amy and Craig, but they didn't let something like a national news-making blackout stop them from exchanging their vows. New York Times reporter Emma G. Fitzsimmons posted the couple's story on Twitter along with an epic photo of the couple in front of a darkened Plaza Hotel taken by the brother of the bride, Justin Rosenthal. Their story went viral.

"I've got a great story from the Great New York City Blackout of 2019," Fitzsimmons wrote. "This couple was getting married at The Plaza. The lights went out during the wedding. They said their vows in the dark. No food; just candles. But they made the best of the situation and danced the night away."

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Photo by Alfons Morales on Unsplash

Last month, the Chicago Public Library system became the largest in the country to eliminate late fees thanks to Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot.

While the move, which was implemented October 1, was intended to "remove unfair barriers to basic library access, especially for youth and low-income patrons," it had another positive outcome. Since the removal of overdue fees, along with the elimination of any outstanding charges on people's accounts, libraries across the city saw a surge in the return of overdue books over the last several weeks.

"The amount of books returned has increased by 240 percent…We're very, very happy to have that. … Those books have a value and cost money to buy. We want those assets back. We also want the patron to come back," Library Commissioner Andrea Telli said at a City Council budget hearing, the Chicago-Sun Times reports.

According to a press release from Lightfoot, late fees rarely have the impact they're intended to. "Research from other fine-free systems has indicated that fines do not increase return rates, and further that the cost of collecting and maintaining overdue fees often outweighs the revenue generated by them."

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Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash

A quarter of domestic cats have had their claws removed. Even though it might make the owners lives a little easier, the procedure can be incredibly painful for the animals and has been described as "barbaric."

Most of Europe and Canada have banned cat declawing (onychectomy), as well as several U.S. cities, but New York just became the first state to do so. Now, any vet who declaws a cat in the there will face a fine of $1,000, unless the procedure is medically necessary.

"Declawing is a cruel and painful procedure that can create physical and behavioral problems for helpless animals, and today it stops," New York GovernorAndrew Cuomo saidin a statement, per USA Today.

Some people get their cat declawed to stop their furniture and flesh from being destroyed. However, declawing a cat isn't the best way to stop a cat from scratching. In fact, it's probably the worst. "If a person has an issue with a cat scratching, well, first of all, I'd advise them don't get a cat because that is the very nature of a cat. But, secondly, there are ways to change cats' behavior. Get scratching posts. There are vinyl sheathes that could be placed on the nails," Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal said. Rosenthal sponsored the bill and is a cat owner, herself. "[T]here's many ways to address that behavior." None of the ways you address the problem should include taking it's claws off.

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