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UPDATE: Back in early June NYC reported zero coronavirus deaths, a number that unfortunately was updated as new information came in. This latest update appears to represent a more certain statistic. Even if there's an adjustment, it's clear that New York City has made an incredible evolution from the world's epicenter of the virus to one that has become America's shining light for paving a path forward to all other major cities and locales in how to combat this deadly disease.

According to Bloomberg News, NYC coronavirus deaths peaked at 799 in one day back on April 9th.

"New Yorkers have been the hero of this story, going above and beyond to keep each other safe," City Hall spokeswoman Avery Cohen said in a statement emailed to Bloomberg.

Original story begins below:

New York State reported five deaths statewide on Sunday but didn't specify where those fatalities occurred. The highest number of deaths statewide was reported on April 9, at 799.

New York City has reported a total of 18,670 confirmed Covid-19 deaths and 4,613 probable ones.On Wednesday, for the first time since early March, New York City logged its first day with zero confirmed deaths from COVID-19. For a city that became the nation's biggest coronavirus hotspot by far, with a daily peak of 590 deaths on April 7, that's wonderful news.

There is one caveat, though. According to the New York Daily News, records released by the city showed three "probable" deaths from the virus, which may very well end up being confirmed. Even at that, though, the milestone of zero confirmed deaths in a 24-hour period was met with celebration by officials in the city, which has seen nearly 17,000 confirmed deaths and more than 4,700 probable deaths in the past three months.

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Shkoryah Carthen has spent half of her life working in the service industry. While the 32-year old restaurant worker quickly sensed that Covid-19 would bring real change to her daily life, Carthen hardly knew just how strongly it would impact her livelihood.

"The biggest challenge for me during this time, honestly is just to stay afloat," Carthen said.

Upon learning the Dallas restaurant she worked for would close indefinitely, Carthen feared its doors may never reopen.

Soon after, Carthen learned that The Wilkinson Center was desperately looking for workers to create and distribute meals for those in need in their community. The next day, Carthen was at the food pantry restocking shelves and creating relief boxes filled with essentials like canned foods, baby formula and cleaning products. In addition to feeding families throughout the area, this work ensured Carthen the opportunity to provide food for her own.

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