This American Sign Language cover of Adele's 'Hello' is the most stunning thing I've seen all week.

When Adele's latest single "Hello" dropped, people were having feelings.

Lots of feelings.


When @adele puts out a new single... She's done it again! πŸ’”πŸ˜­πŸ™Œ#Hello #25 #SheHadMeAtHello
A photo posted by Kate Hudson (@katehudson) on

Adele explained that "Hello" is "not about an ex-relationship, a love relationship, it's about my relationship with everyone that I love. It's not that we have fallen out, we've all got our lives going on and I needed to write that song so they would all hear it, because I'm not in touch with them."

It turns out a lot of people can relate to that.

Adele's original video was beautiful β€” beautiful enough, in fact, that it's been viewed over 264 million times so far.

But there's another version of "Hello" that's memorable and beautiful, too β€” and it's making us have those feelings all over again. It's a sign language interpretation of it.

GIFs via Molly Lou Bartholomew/Vimeo.

Molly Lou Bartholomew is a professional nationally certified ASL interpreter. She shared on her YouTube channel that her "number one passion in life" is "artistic/theatrical interpreting in ASL (American Sign Language)."

We're glad she shares her passion, because she's sooo good.

You probably want to watch the whole thing while listening to the lyrics, right? Enjoy the feelings all over again!

It's estimated that there are 500,000 to 2 million American Sign Language users in the U.S.

Just last week, a video of a woman named Rebecca King uploaded to Facebook went viral. King, who is deaf, was placing her order in ASL at a Starbucks, where the barista communicated with her using ASL on the video monitor at the drive-through. The video has been viewed over 10 million times, bringing a lot of exposure to the value of communication using ASL.

Bartholomew's stunning interpretation of "Hello" just exemplifies the beauty of the language.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message β€” 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again β€” and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.