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cello, music, goblins

Rushad Eggleston's music videos are musically impressive and bizarrely entertaining.

The other day my 21-year-old daughter came into the living room singing a random, rhythmic chant of some sort that sounded like it was a different language. She got to a line that I misheard as "pequeño" and then giggled. I asked her what she was singing, and she said it was a TikTok of a guy playing the cello and the kazoo and singing gibberish.

"Let me just show you," she said. "It's too hard to explain."

She was right. When you watch a Rushad Eggleston video, it's hard to explain. Most will leave you saying, "What the heck did I just watch?" yet still wanting to watch more. They are riveting in the weirdest way possible.


I've never seen anything like this, and chances are you haven't either. In this video, Eggleston plays the cello in a 7-in-1 beat bouncy rhythm (which my string-playing, music major daughter assures me is much harder than it looks) while singing/chanting random, nonsensical words in a voice that can only be described as goblin-like. Not only that, but he does so while showing his drawings of cartoon creatures with text boxes in which the gibberish lyrics he's singing are written.

@rushadicus

7-in-1 bounce gets decorated by thnarks partying in their mystical world of sneth #cello #kazoo #nonsense #metal #otherworldly #cartoon #astral #7

Super bizarro but catchy, right? And what about the kazoo attached to his cello? That part killed me.

The comments on the video are hilarious.

"Goblin metal," wrote one person, which is genuinely the perfect description. "Gremlin core" is a close second. Another wrote, "'otherworldly' usually means 'heavenly' but this has big purgatory energy and I'm here for it."

But my personal favorite was: "The devil went down to Georgia in a different timeline."

Eggleston has created a whole fantastical world—The Land of Sneth—where these creatures live and have their own language (though they sometimes speak English, too, which for some reason makes it even funnier).

@rushadicus

a gentle romping song takes a turn for the bnithual #cello #cartoon #lofi #producer #argument

"I do what I want, though?" I died. Why is this so random and so weird and so fantastic?

I had no idea who Rushad Eggleston was when my daughter introduced me to his TikTok channel. It seemed pretty clear to me that he had musical talent, but as it turns out, the guy has wicked musical talent.

Eggleston attended Berklee College of Music—one of the most prestigious music schools in the nation—on a full scholarship after winning a competition. He was nominated for a Grammy in 2002 for his collaborative work with Fiddler's Four. He's taught string camps to kids. He's recorded albums and toured the world doing live shows.

Who knew?

The Berklee website describes Eggleston as "an eclectic, whimsical, inventive performer and personality." On Facebook, he describes himself as "an imaginative nomadic wild cello goblin, ambassador of sneth, and spreader of joy."

How else would you describe this?

@rushadicus

the kluthy kluthy power of bnithuixx #cello #viola #kazoo #fiddle #oldtime #country #acoustic #rock #cartoon #thnarks

Eggleston does make more traditionally beautiful music as well. You have to wade through the goblin metal and gremlin core to find it, but it's there.

Case in point:

@rushadicus

the guitar took over my marfuaning this marfuaning #guitar #flatpicking #acoustic #melody #country

Eggleston's musical stylings may not be everyone's cup of tea, and his Land of Sneth with its "bnithual" characters may be too out there for some people, but my family has found a great deal of joy watching his truly one-of-a-kind videos and enjoying his unique musical offerings.

In today's topsy-turvy pandemic-ridden world, some silly, creative joy is more than welcome. You can find more of Rushad Eggleston on TikTok, Instagram and Facebook.

10/10. The Mayyas dance.

We can almost always expect to see amazing acts and rare skills on “America’s Got Talent.” But sometimes, we get even more than that.

The Mayyas, a Lebanese women’s dance troupe whose name means “proud walk of a lioness,” delivered a performance so mesmerizing that judge Simon Cowell called it the “best dance act” the show has ever seen, winning them an almost instant golden buzzer.

Perhaps this victory comes as no surprise, considering that the Mayyas had previously won “Arab’s Got Talent” in 2019 and competed on “Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions.” But truly, it’s what motivates them to take to the stage that’s remarkable.

“Lebanon is a very beautiful country, but we live a daily struggle," one of the dancers said to the judges just moments before their audition. Another explained, “being a dancer as a female Arab is not fully supported yet.”

Nadim Cherfan, the team’s choreographer, added that “Lebanon is not considered a place where you can build a career out of dancing, so it’s really hard, and harder for women.”

Still, Cherfan shared that it was a previous “AGT” star who inspired the Mayyas to defy the odds and audition anyway. Nightbirde, a breakout singer who also earned a golden buzzer before tragically passing away in February 2021 due to cancer, had told the audience, “You can't wait until life isn't hard anymore before you decide to be happy.” The dance team took the advice to heart.

For the Mayyas, coming onto the “AGT” stage became more than an audition opportunity. Getting emotional, one of the dancers declared that it was “our only chance to prove to the world what Arab women can do, the art we can create, the fights we fight.”

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