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History (Education)

Education

Neil deGrasse Tyson explains why the heck we have leap days

Neil deGrasse Tyson sat down with comedian Chuck Nice to give an entertaining and informative explanation of our calendar's biggest head scratcher.

Norwegian University of Science and Technology/Wikipedia, Representative Image from Canva

Neil deGrasse Tyson explains why we have a Leap Year.

While Neil deGrasse Tyson might usually break down the more complex mysteries of our universe, he also has a knack for discussing the mundane in a way that makes it every bit as interesting.

On a recent episode of the StarTalk Podcast, where the popular astrophysicist chats about “everything under the sun; Or rather under the universe!” Tyson sat down with comedian Chuck Nice to break down how and why Leap Day came to be.

“People seem to be mystified by it. A day just shows up on the calendar,” Tyson told Nice.

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Education

Unearthed BBC interview features two Victorian-era women discussing being teens in the 1800s

Frances 'Effy' Jones, one of the first women to be trained to use a typewriter and to take up cycling as a hobby, recalls life as a young working woman in London.

Two Victorian women discuss being teens in the 1800s.

There remains some mystery around what life was like in the 1800s, especially for teens. Most people alive today were not around in the Victorian era when the technologies now deemed old-fashioned were a novelty. In this rediscovered 1970s clip from the BBC, two elderly women reminisce about what it was like being teenagers during a time when the horse and buggy was still the fastest way to get around.

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Getting ready now takes far less time than it once did.

If you ever find yourself lamenting how long it takes to make yourself look presentable these days, be glad you weren’t alive in 1857. A woman who goes by @sewn.by.ellen describes herself on Instagram as a “fashion historian and historian costumer” recently posted a video captioned “Getting dressed in 1857,” and suffice it to say, the process was much lengthier and more complicated than whatever you have going on these days.

The Swedish content Swedish content creator begins the video wearing “chemise and drawers,” which she describes as the layers that would be closest to her body and washed most frequently.

Next is the corset, which @sewn.by.ellen says “creates the correct shape for the time and also supports the bust and makes my posture so much better.”

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Strikers, Ludlow Tent Colony, 1914.

The early 1900s were a time of great social upheaval in our country. During the years leading up to the Ludlow Massacre, miners all around the country looking to make a better life for themselves and their families set up picket lines, organized massive parades and rallies, and even took up arms. Some died.

It's always worth considering why history like this was never taught in school before. Could it be that the powers that be would rather keep this kind of thing under wraps?

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