GOOD News
via ReMARKable Cleanouts / Facebook

One of the oddest things about the COVID-19 pandemic is that it's hard to identify people at times because they are wearing a mask. It can be tough noticing people you regularly see in the community because more than half their face is obscured.

In this case, people were trying to locate and identify John Thomas Archer, a 23-year-old architecture student who wowed people in the ReMARKable Cleanouts second-hand store in Norwood, Massachusetts. But it was hard to figure out who he is because of the mask he wore to protect him from getting or spreading COVID-19.

On Saturday, July 11, he walked into the store and asked an employee, Melissa Rediker, if he could play one of the pianos on display, it had a "Do Not Play' sign attached.

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Mauro Gotti

We are often bombarded with fear-mongering and shocking headlines that make us feel that the world is falling apart.

However, while it's important to report on problems and issues, I believe there is so much good in this world that it needs to be found and promoted just as widely.

Because of that, I started The Happy Broadcast. It's an anti-venom to the vitriolic rhetoric that pervades our media. Also, this year, I've illustrated even more happy news than in 2018.

We need more positive news to acknowledge that the world is actually getting better little by little.

More info: Instagram

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Mauro Gatti

When I'm working on The Happy Broadcast, I try to pick news that has an international appeal and touches themes like animal rights, climate change and science. News that shows how much we're progressing on many fronts despite being often bombarded with few-mongering headlines.


I think there are many reasons why negative news is dominating the media. It's like a sudden disaster a, it's more compelling than, for example, little improvements. Bad things can happen quickly, but good things aren't built in a day, and as they unfold, they're out of sync with the news cycle.

As humans, we have this thing called "negative bias" that make us respond quicker to bad or dangerous situations. Nowadays, this bias is getting in the way of our happiness and well-being, and even our productivity because most of the narrative surrounding us (print, online or mobile) is that the "world is ending".

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Mauro Gatti

I think we should find a balance between negative and positive news. From politics to climate change and economy, negative and bad news surrounds us everywhere we go. A potential solution could be to limit the amount of bad news, basically slow down our personal news cycle, adding some positive news to our "news diet" to make sure that our outlook on the world is more optimistic. Also, it's very important to invest time to deal with misinformation and the reliability of news sources.

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