Kristen Stewart asks Jesse Eisenberg insulting questions to prove a point about sexism in the media.

Imagine you can ask Kristen Stewart ANY question you want. Ready? Go!

Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images.


Here are some reasonable choices:

  1. What's your favorite role you've ever played?
  2. What was it like working with Jodie Foster on "Panic Room" and who are the actresses you look up to the most?
  3. Which script was funnier, "Adventureland" or "Breaking Dawn — Part 2"?

Sadly, all entertainment reporters seem to care about is:

  1. Who are you dating?
  2. No, but seriously, who are you dating?
  3. C'mon, tell us who you're dating!

A person can only take so many questions about Robert Pattinson, am I right?

But this is just the way it is for most actresses. While Stewart's male costars get insightful interview questions about career and craft, women are forced to talk about their latest hairstyle and walk the "manicure runway" — yep, that's a real thing.

But! In a new skit from Funny or Die, Kristen Stewart gets a little revenge by turning these sexist interview questions on Jesse Eisenberg, her costar in "American Ultra."

In the hilarious video, Jesse and Kristen sit down to interview each other, only to find out they've been given each other's question cards.


All GIFs via Funny or Die.

Things get interesting when Kristen starts asking Jesse all kinds of inane questions usually reserved for, well, her.

"Levi's," Eisenberg says. But "I don't know if that's a person."

Stewart moves on to the next question, a classic:

Eisenberg, shockingly, is not with child.

And, of course, no interview of a Hollywood actress would be complete without at least one mention of breasts:

Finally, Eisenberg's had enough.

"I just feel like a lot of the questions you're asking me feel like they're ... not about the movie," he says.

Exactly!

There's a difference between trying to humanize an actress and reducing her to the most basic of female stereotypes.

Sticking only to questions about the movie or her career could probably get a little boring, but how about we show a little creativity and insight? How about we go a little deeper than what dress she's wearing or whether she feels like her biological clock is ticking?

Or, at the very least, how about we start subjecting men to the same kinds of vapid interviews women have endured for so long?

If this video with Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg is any indication, this kind of red carpet equality is long overdue:

We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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