Dove is offering $5,000 to dads without parental leave at their jobs.

The workplace has daddy issues. While it’s common for a new mother to take maternity leave postpartum, there’s still a stigma surrounding paternity leave.

Most dads don’t have access to paid time off to experience their child’s crucial first few weeks of life. Furthermore, they feel as if their jobs might be in jeopardy if they do opt to spend time with their bundle of joy.

In order to combat the stigma around paternity leave, Dove Men+Care is offering $5,000 to new dads planning to take full-time paternity leave. Dove has pledged $1 million to new fathers across America for the next two years.


“Less than 1 in 5 men in the U.S. are offered any paid paternity leave. Most dads who do have it don’t believe they can take their full time off to care for a newborn. It’s time to change that," Dove wrote on their website ."Working dads shouldn’t have to choose between their children and a paycheck—because when they take paternity leave, it benefits families, workplaces and communities.”

Currently, companies with 50 or more employees are unable to fire workers for taking up to 12 weeks ofparental leave, however they are not required to pay them.

Children are expensive, and money is an object when parents are deciding whether or not they should spend time with their newborn.  Currently,70% of new dads will take 10 days of paternity leave – or less.

Dove Men+Care hopes that the campaign will raise awareness for the importance of paternity leave as well as the impact of paternity leave on children.

"While the role dads play in the lives of their families continues to evolve, 87 percent of dads report being more satisfied with their lives when they can be the caregivers they want to be," Unilever, the company that manufactures Dove Care+Men, stated in a press release.

The campaign is backed by Alex Ohanian, Reddit co-founder and husband to Serena Williams. After becoming a father to daughter Alexis Olympia, Ohanian realized just how important it is for fathers to spend time with their newborns. “No dad should have to sacrifice taking leave, and I’ve been very public about taking mine in an effort to show other men that you can still be an ambitious business person while also taking time for your family,” Ohanian said.

Studies have shown that newborn babies benefit from having their fathers around just as much as they benefit  from having their mothers around. (Not to mention having dad around to help can be a relief to exhausted mom.) It’ll be interesting to see how Dove Men+Care’s initiative will impact a future generation of children and the society they will inherit.  

You can apply for the paternity leave fund on the Dove website.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.