It's no secret that Hollywood has a diversity and representation problem.

For years, Hollywood has produced television shows and movies that often portray Muslims, South Asians, and Middle Eastern people with harmful stereotypes.

According to Jack Shaheen, a writer focusing on Arab representation in cinema, Muslim and Arab characters are often confined to three archetypes. He called them "the three B's": bombers, billionaires, and belly dancers. And sometimes, in addition to swinging their hips as belly dancers, some of the women are depicted as living under oppression in black abayas and burqas.

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This year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has become a lot bigger — and more diverse.

The Academy of Motion Pictures invited a record 928 new members, making the 2018 class the largest in history.

Photo by Emma McIntyre Getty Images for for Motion Picture & Television Fund.

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It might seem perfectly normal today, but releasing a gay mainstream film in 1997 was bold and brave.

In 2018, critics and audiences alike raved about "Love, Simon" which told the story of a young man struggling to come out and accept his sexuality. But 21 years ago, another film helped pave the way for films like it, and found a surprisingly warm reception at a time when LGBTQ positive films were still incredibly rare.

Director Frank Oz says he was inspired to make "In & Out" after watching Tom Hanks accept the Best Actor Oscar for 1993's "Philadelphia." But instead of replicating that film's dramatic arc, he wanted to use the power of comedy to tell a meaningful story that would help build compassion and understanding for those facing the very real challenges of coming out.

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"Crazy Rich Asians" is coming to Hollywood, and it’s making some history at the same time.    

Photo via Warner Bros.

Based on the wildly popular 2013 book by Kevin Kwan, "Crazy Rich Asians" follows Rachel Chu (played by Constance Wu) and Nicky Young (Henry Golding), a young Asian-American couple in love. Unbeknownst to Rachel, the love of her life comes from Singapore's wealthiest family and is one of the country's most eligible bachelors. When Rachel agrees to meet Nick's family in Singapore, she’s thrown into a totally unexpected, wild, and ultimately hilarious new lifestyle. The novel was so popular that filmmakers quickly adapted it for the big screen.          

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