There have been many iconic dance routines throughout film history, but how many have the honor being called "the greatest" by Fred Astaire himself?

Fayard and Harold Nicholas, known collectively as the Nicholas Brothers, were arguably the best at what they did during their heyday. Their coordinated tap routines are legendary, not only because they were great dancers, but because of their incredible ability to jump into the air and land in the splits. Repeatedly. From impressive heights.

Their most famous routine comes from the movie "Stormy Weather." As Cab Calloway sings "Jumpin' Jive," the Nicholas Brothers make the entire set their dance floor, hopping and tapping from podium to podium amongst the musicians, dancing up and down stairs and across the top of a piano.

But what makes this scene extra impressive is that they performed it without rehearsing it first and it was filmed in one take—no fancy editing room tricks to bring it all together. This fact was confirmed in a conversation with the brothers in a Chicago Tribune article in 1997, when they were both in their 70s:

"Would you believe that was one of the easiest things we ever did?" Harold told the paper.

"Did you know that we never even rehearsed that number?" added Fayard.

"When it came time to do that part, (choreographer) Nick Castle said: 'Just do it. Don`t rehearse it, just do it.' And so we did it—in one little take. And then he said: 'That's it—we can't do it any better than that.'"

Keep Reading Show less
Via Olivia Newton-John / Instagram

A recent airing of "Grease" on the BBC resulted in a backlash online with some calling for it to be banned from further showings.

Critics cited the scene where John Travolta's character Danny Zuko repeatedly tries to put a move on Sandy Osbourne, played by Olivia-Newton John, but she pushes him away.

They also called the film homophobic because the dance contest is for straight couples only.

Keep Reading Show less
Lifetime/Twitter

At this point it seems like the best choice is to fully lean into the absurdity of everything as we claw our way out of the weirdest, if not the worst, year in recent memory. And from that perspective, Lifetime's new Kentucky Fried Chicken mini-movie—yep, you read that right—totally fits the bill.

I mean, Mario Lopez playing a sexy Colonel Sanders in a murderous love triangle romance thriller plot seems right on schedule, doesn't it? We did the whole "Tiger King" thing early in the pandemic, so it's high time for another "What did I just watch?" guilty pleasure.

Lifetime's "A Recipe for Seduction" is clearly a marketing ploy for KFC, but who cares. The trailer is deliciously wonderful and horrible, leaving me unable to look away long enough to roll my eyes at its ridiculousness. Like, I don't want to admit that I actually want to watch this because I'm not a fan of humiliation, but at the same, I totally want to watch this.

Keep Reading Show less
via Suburban Snow White / Twitter

When most people think of the "Home Alone" franchise, they remember the original 1990 blockbuster starring Macaulay Culkin that plays on TV throughout the holiday season. Most people will also have a vague recollection of its 1992 sequel, "Home Alone 2: Lost in New York," that's best known these days for having a Donald Trump cameo.

However, there are actually five films in the "Home Alone" franchise. Nineteen-ninety-seven's Culkin-free "Home Alone 3" was a flop about an eight-year-old prodigy who defends his home from a band of criminals who work for a North Korean terrorist organization.

The next two films, "Home Alone 4: Taking Back the House," (2002) and "Home Alone: The Holiday Heist" (2012) were made-for-TV movies.

Keep Reading Show less