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Mark Ruffalo confesses to nearly quitting '13 Going on 30' over its iconic dance scene
Mark Ruffalo at Comic Con/Gage Skidmore and screenshot via YouTube

Mark Ruffalo and Jennifer Garner in '13 Going on 30'

The early 2000s were a golden age for Hollywood rom-coms. Think of classics like "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days," "Bridget Jones' Diary," "Love Actually" and, of course, "13 Going on 30," starring Jennifer Garner and pre-Marvel Mark Ruffalo. Who wouldn't fawn over their clumsy yet endearing chemistry in the film's iconic "Thriller" dance sequence.

And to think, the world was nearly deprived of such a performance.


During an interview in March with theSkimm, Garner shared that Ruffalo nearly quit the production after only one dance rehearsal.

"Our first rehearsal, I think it was Mark and Judy [Greer] and me, and Judy and I were both dancers growing up and poor Mark didn't know that," Garner explained. "And he came in and he hated the rehearsal process so much he almost dropped out."

Jennifer Garner texts with theSkimmwww.youtube.com

Jennifer Garner texts with theSkimm

Ruffalo recently decided to elaborate on this behind-the-scenes story, reposted by Comments by Celebs. It seems Garner wasn't exaggerating.


"It didn't help that it took me three hours to learn what Jen mastered in about 20 minutes! 😆😂😆," he said. "Matty [Ruffalo's character in the movie] had to be dragged out on that dance floor as well, poor guy. But all this time later he is grateful he did!"

And we're grateful as well, Mark. The rom-com world is better because of it.

In case you missed this legendary dance number, here it is, full of awkward monster arm movements and teen angst for your viewing pleasure:

The Thriller Dance | 13 Going On 30 | Love Lovewww.youtube.com



Has all this talk about Jennifer Garner and Mark Ruffalo left you feeling nostalgic and wanting more? The two are actually set to work together again in yet another semi-sci-fi rom-com hybrid coming to Netflix called The Adam Project. (You even get the added bonus of Ryan Reynolds, so we know it's something to look forward to.) And if this post is any indication, it looks like Ruffalo and Garner are having just as much fun the second time around.



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