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10 things that made us smile this week

With summer on its way out and the Delta variant on its way in, we could all use a mental and emotional pick-me-up. Here are 10 things that brought a smile to our faces this week. We hope they do the same for you.

1. The top two high jump champions choosing to share the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics.

When they tied for first place, they could have done a jump-off to see who got gold and who got silver. But Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim and Italy's Gianmarco Tamberi, who are friends both on and off the field, opted to share the gold medal—and their celebration is one for the ages. Read the story here.

2. Speaking of golden Olympic moments, how these swimmers celebrated with Tatjana Schoenmaker when she broke the world record.

At the end of the day, the Olympics is about excellence, sportsmanship, and international friendship. This reaction of South Africa's Tatjana Schoenmaker to breaking a world record in the 200-meter breaststroke is great, but the way her competitors shared in her joy is totally delightful.



3. 7-year-old Rowyn Montgomery giving his second-grade classmates a pre-school-year pep talk.

After Rowyn was bullied at school, he decided to make kids happy by making motivational videos for them. What an amazing kiddo! Read more about Rowyn here.

Tiverton 7-Year-Old Has a Motivational Message for his Classmatesyoutu.be

4. Rescued chimpanzee's affectionate reunion with his foster parents.

According to WSVN, Limbani the chimpanzee was born with pneumonia and rejected by his mother, so he was nursed to health by foster parents who gave him round-the-clock care and nurturing in the early months of his life. Though people have varying opinions about rescued animals being kept in captivity, there is no question that the affection between Limbani and his caregivers is real.

5. Speaking of reunions, this soldier surprising her mom at work is just the best.

There's no shortage of surprise military homecoming videos out there, but they're always awesome to see. The emotional toll of having loved ones deployed is palpable when you see the relief and joy in these reunions.

6. This abuela tossing aside her cane and showing us her incredible dance moves.

I dare you to watch this video start to finish and not smile. So much life in this lovely elder, and so much joy in watching her express herself through dancing.

7. Speaking of elders, check out this young man forming a human chair for a woman stuck on an elevator.

Cesar Larios was performing a move for his moving company in 2014 when he got stuck inside an elevator in an assisted living facility inside a 10-story building. Stuck with him was 79-year-old Rita Young who had trouble walking and standing for too long. To help her out, Larlos made himself into a chair so she could sit for the 30 minutes they had to wait to be rescued. Read the story here.

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8. On the other end of the age spectrum, did you catch the 14-year-old phenom diver who kept getting perfect 10s in her first Olympics?

Quan Hongchan of China is a marvel, truly. This Olympics is her first international competition, and she completely blew everyone else out of the water with a series of perfect dives to take home the gold. Such a joy to see such incredible talent in someone so young.

9. And even younger, the three 13-year-olds and a 12-year-old who took home four of the six medals in women's skateboarding.

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Skateboarding made its Olympic debut in Tokyo, and the medal results show how much potential exists in the sport. But even more than that, the camaraderie and joyful support of the young athletes at the skate park was a delight to see. The six medalists in the two women's events were ages 19, 16, 13, 13, 13, and 12, which is just incredible. Read the story here.

10. If that doesn't dazzle you, perhaps this proud, pretty peacock will.

Sometimes a simple natural phenomenon is all we need to be reminded of the inherent beauty and wonder in the world. No matter how many times you see it, a peacock showing off its plumage is always stunning. And in slo-mo, the shimmy just adds an extra layer of awesome.

There we go. Amazing Olympic moments, incredible humans young and old, delightful reunions, and awesome animals. The world is full of beauty and goodness—we just have to keep looking for it.

Happy weekend, everyone!

Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

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Science

Dyslexic plumber gets a life-changing boost after his friend built an app that texts for him

It uses AI to edit his work emails into "polite, professional-sounding British English."

via Pixabay

An artist's depiction of artificial intelligence.

There is a lot of mistrust surrounding the implementation of artificial intelligence these days and some of it is justified. There's reason to worry that deep-fake technology will begin to seriously blur the line between fantasy and reality, and people in a wide range of industries are concerned AI could eliminate their jobs.

Artists and writers are also bothered that AI works on reappropriating existing content for which the original creators will never receive compensation.

The World Economic Forum recently announced that AI and automation are causing a huge shake-up in the world labor market. The WEF estimates that the new technology will supplant about 85 million jobs by 2025. However, the news isn’t all bad. It also said that its analysis anticipates the “future tech-driven economy will create 97 million new jobs.”

The topic of AI is complex, but we can all agree that a new story from England shows how AI can certainly be used for the betterment of humanity. It was first covered by Tom Warren of BuzzFeed News.

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This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


On May 28, 2014, 13-year-old Athena Orchard of Leicester, England, died of bone cancer. The disease began as a tumor in her head and eventually spread to her spine and left shoulder. After her passing, Athena's parents and six siblings were completely devastated. In the days following her death, her father, Dean, had the difficult task of going through her belongings. But the spirits of the entire Orchard family got a huge boost when he uncovered a secret message written by Athena on the backside of a full-length mirror.

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Famous writers shared their book signing woes with a disheartened new author.

Putting creative work out into the world to be evaluated and judged is nerve-wracking enough as it is. Having to market your work, especially if you're not particularly extroverted or sales-minded, is even worse.

So when you're a newly published author holding a book signing and only two of the dozens of people who RSVP'd show up, it's disheartening if not devastating. No matter how much you tell yourself "people are just busy," it feels like a rejection of you and your work.

Debut novelist Chelsea Banning recently experienced this scenario firsthand, and her sharing it led to an amazing deluge of support and solidarity—not only from other aspiring authors, but from some of the top names in the writing business.

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