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He Makes The Best Pro-Life Argument I've Heard In A Long Time

This video focuses on a particular conflict in a particular part of the world (and one that seems to have cooled off for a bit?), but the message is true of every conflict, everywhere in the world.Like my mom used to say, "I don't care who started it. You finish it."

He Makes The Best Pro-Life Argument I've Heard In A Long Time

Sometimes the simplest message is the most profound. But if sharing it with others starts a discussion instead of thoughtfully ending it, here are some other references to have handy about this particular area:

Brush up on history, but keep it recent.


Many a family argument starts by rehashing ancient grudges, and zero have been ended that way. Think about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the same way. Try to keep your conversation points recent and relevant. The violence earlier this year was the worst seen in the region since 2009. There's a lot to untangle to understand what happened, but it started with the murder of three young Israeli men in the West Bank. Shortly after, a Palestinian boy was murdered by six Israelis "in an act of revenge." Violence against children was central to the latest hostilities.

Find the human angle.

Sometimes it's hard to talk about conflict in scale. It can help to ground your conversations with more personal narratives that talk about Israelis and Palestinians as people and communities, who live in real places. It's really hard to have a satisfying conversation that centers on faceless politicized or religious entities. Especially when it's about a place many people have only imagined through biblical stories. So keep your convo close to those children discussed in the video above and other folks that you and others can relate to.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

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In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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via Beto el Curioso / YouTube

It must be terribly unnerving to wake up one day and realize the government thinks you're dead, even though you're alive and kicking. You'd figure that if you were declared dead and weren't, you'd have some say in the matter.

However, for a woman in France, things haven't been that easy.

Jeanne Pouchain, 58, who lives in the village of St. Joseph, near Lyon, had a rude awakening three years ago when she received a letter from the Lyon court of appeals declaring that her family members need to pay the money she allegedly owed.

Because, according to state records, she was deceased.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.