One of the poorest areas of LA is about to get a new arts center, thanks to rap mogul Dr. Dre.

Don't act like you forgot about Dre.

Remember when Dr. Dre was "back again"? Well now he's back again, again!

After decades of hits like "Still D.R.E." and "Forgot About Dre," Dr. Dre wants us to know ... this time, he's back for real.



Lyrics: "Hi there, I'm Dre! Great to see you again." All GIFs from "Still D.R.E."

Dre just dropped his first solo album in 16 years, called simply "Compton," as an exclusive on iTunes and Apple Music. Early reviews say it's a nice return to form for the good doctor, but even if you're not a rap fan, there's still a good reason to give this one a listen.

Dre still has love for the streets, where he got his start — that's why he's donating the royalties from his new album to fund a new performing arts center in Compton.

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Coachella.

There's been a lot of talk and debate lately about what, why, how, and if streaming services like Apple Music are paying artists properly. Wilco just decided to give their album away for free to encourage fans to support lesser known artists, while Taylor Swift pulled her entire catalog from Apple in an effort to pressure them to pay artists more fairly.

Dr. Dre decided to take a different approach regarding money he doesn't necessarily "need."

"I've been really trying to do something special for Compton and just couldn't quite figure out what it was," Dre told Zane Lowe.

He got in touch with the mayor of Compton, Aja Brown, who had already been working on the project, and decided to pitch in.

"He clearly has a heart for Compton, especially our youth," Brown said. "I believe this performing arts center will provide a pathway for creative expression ... (and) a much-needed safe haven for our youth."

Despite being glamorized over the years in hip-hop, Compton could really use the help.

The real Compton. Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

In 1988, Dr. Dre helped produced NWA's debut album "Straight Outta Compton." I'd be willing to bet most Americans don't even actually know where Compton is (it's in South LA), just that it's the birthplace of gangsta rap and real, actual gangs like the Bloods.

But today, the city has major problems. According to U.S. Census data, only about 6.7% people over the age of 25 in Compton have a four-year college degree or higher, not to mention the city's violent crime rate, which is about three times the California average.

Young people in Compton need better options, and Dr. Dre is stepping up to the plate to give them some.

Dr. Dre has done a lot of good over the years. But this is a really cool gesture.

Lyrics: "I'm not particularly fond of people who don't care about disadvantaged youths."

He's done some bad, too. You don't have to love him, like him, or even really respect him.

But Dr. Dre, born Andre Young, is actually from Compton, so it's just nice to see he's not turning his back on a community that needs him now more than ever. There's honor in that.

More
Facebook / Colette Kingston

A sanitation worker near Kansas City, Missouri is inspiring others with his kind act that was caught on camera.

Billy Shelby, 50, was collecting trash when he witnessed Opal Zucca, 88, fall trying to bring her bin back to her house. So for the last 10 months, he's been doing it for her to make sure it never happens again.

Zucca's daughter, Colette Kingston, found out what Shelby was doing thanks to video from her mother's Ring surveillance camera. Inspired by Shelby's big heart, Kingston shared the video on Facebook, which shows the man holding Zucca's hand and chatting with her as they walk up her driveway.

[facebook https://www.facebook.com/colette.kingston/videos/10157439423166067/?__xts__[0]=68.ARAscWKURe6rWEKLRnQ_5sWIi4WcZIEEKnOrHMI_SQdqBABzCvAx0424B00HLADEN7jv-T000f7zbTnxj07wUCSwjlkiZ9YynvDvr3Pl3VbTgtFldJtZyQZLQucNcqefmGbsCe8poRbKaZ4mSRnDh1iibGs_Bbt5yOvcUzGuuhobKnTBWC3HQ44qBGL-1gPut0ppiODGWE4Bh5mRlfIDi8RNZKI4Ag&__tn__=-R expand=1]

"God bless you as always, darling!" Shelby says to Zucca. "You're looking good. That hair! You got it down!"

Keep Reading Show less
popular

If there's one thing that unites us all, it's the inevitability of death. That may sound morbid, and it's not something most of us care to think about, but our mortality is something every person on Earth has in common.

However, ideas and beliefs about what dying means are as diverse as humanity itself. So when someone manages to nail a universal truth about death, we pay attention. And when someone does so in a way that touches us deeply, we share it as a way to say, "Look at this gorgeous evidence of our shared human experience."

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via Lyft

One of the most under-reported challenges to lifting people out of the cycle of poverty is transportation. The vast majority of American cities are car-dependent and jobs are increasingly moving towards suburban areas. This puts the urban poor in a terrible position, with many jobs out of town and inaccessible without a car.

A recent report by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia detailed the problem, saying:

"In nearly every discussion held … access to reliable transportation was discussed as a necessary component of economic mobility and quality of life. Many residents in northeastern Pennsylvania — especially lower-income or elderly residents — couldn't access employment, were missing doctor's appointments, couldn't get their children to child care, and couldn't participate in social, religious, and cultural events, all as a result of the lack of transportation. Residents from the region who did not own a car were stuck — literally and figuratively."

As part of a $50 million commitment to "improve our cities through transportation infrastructure, donated transportation, and sustainability initiatives" ride hailing app Lyft has launched a new program designed to help low-income people overcome their transportation obstacles.

RELATED: A blind inventor created a 'smart cane' with Google Maps to help visually-impaired people get around

Lyft's Jobs Access Program aims to close short-term transportation gaps related to employment access and job training. It will provide people with free rides to job interviews and, if hired, free transportation to and from work until their first paycheck.

"We know that for the unemployed, reliable transportation to a job interview or to the first few weeks of work can mean the difference between successful, long-term employment and lost opportunities," a Lyft spokesperson told Upworthy.

via Lyft

Lyft aims to help immigrants, refugees, the formerly incarcerated, people with disabilities, and low-income workers or unemployed people living in low-income areas through the program.

"There's so many different types of candidates we're aiming to help," Mike Masserman, Lyft's head of social impact and former executive director for Export Policy, Promotion, and Strategy under the Obama Administration, told Fast Company.

"One example is the 18- to 24-year-old person who might be going to their very first job, or doesn't have a way of getting to their job interview . . . In some cases, folks are taking four different buses to get to work."

RELATED: Pizza guy whose quick thinking saved a woman's life gets the reward of a lifetime

The program is available in over 35 markets throughout the U.S. and Canada via Lyft's partners, including: United Way and 211, The USO, Goodwill, National Down Syndrome Society, Year Up, Generation, #cut50 (Dream Corps), The Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth, and Upwardly Global.

Lyft will provide ride credits to the nonprofits to distribute among their clientele as they see fit.

"We really defer to our nonprofit partners on that," says Masserman. "They're the ones that understand their constituency base the best."

Those who are interested in the Jobs Access Program and aren't currently affiliated with any of the aforementioned nonprofits can reach out to the United Way via it's 211 help number to learn more about their eligibility.

Prosperity

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is famous for her workouts. When the documentary RBG came out, the trailer started with her pumping iron (or rather, hand weights). In 2017, her personal trainer, Bryant Jonhson, even wrote a book about her, entitled The RBG Workout: How She Stays Strong ... And You Can Too! And when she did her fitness routine with Stephen Colbert, he struggled. The 86-year-old Supreme Court justice still gets her reps in, even after her recent bout with pancreatic cancer. Like that's going to stop her?


Stephen Works Out With Ruth Bader Ginsburg youtu.be


Keep Reading Show less
popular