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Someone asked Millennials why they always joke about dying and the answers were pretty serious

Every generation has its own sense of humor. Older generations just don't get it and the younger ones just can't understand it.

Generation X had a love of irony. In the '90s, they wore old T-Shirts of bands they didn't like and laughed at obscure references in music and films. "Pulp Fiction," anybody?

Millennials are a much more sincere group with a shared love of the absurd. Shows like "Rick and Morty" and "The Eric Andre Show" are great examples.


The Washington Post tried to address the issue in 2017 and found that Millennial humor is rooted in a sense of pointless dread.

"... that as the economic climate has delayed milestones such as marriage, kids and home ownership, and external sources of meaning such as religion have faded away, life has started to feel unpleasantly rootless, something that is being reflected in a stranger, more chaotic form of comedy."

One way this is expressed is through memes where Millenials wish for their own death.

Reddit user here_for_the_dog doesn't understand Millennial death memes so they asked the online forum r/OutOftheLoop.

"I rarely understand references in obscure memes," they wrote. "I definitely don't understand where all this about Millennials wanting to die came from. Like is this some stupid attention seeking trend? Is it a real issue that needs to be addressed? Or was it just a poorly constructed joke that is getting out of hand?

The responses provided a thorough explanation of why Millennials joke about awaiting the sweet embrace of death. The big takeaway is that the jokes are rooted in serious problems they deeply care about.

The first poster did a great job of encapsulating the Millennial mindset.


Humor is a great coping mechanism.


RELATED: There's a reason most millennials can't afford to buy a house. And it's not avocado toast.


Economic uncertainty is a big part of it.



Climate change.



Burn out is a big part of it.



Because the 2010s suck.



It feels like something is missing.



Morrissey nailed it right on the head.



One person thought they'd share a little advice on happiness to cheer Millenials up.


RELATED: Someone asked Twitter, 'What's the most Gen X thing you ever did?' and the responses were awesome

After the post went virral, the original poster responded with a sorry/not sorry.

" ... mostly it sounds like a general frustration at being underprepared and then under appreciated for getting it done despite the odds and thank god for the internet because it is the only place I feel heard and understood that I can still afford to visit and vent."

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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