Church is a house of worship, not a house of fashion.You should be able to go to church to get in touch with your spirituality without getting shamed for your fashion choices. But that wasn't the case for a young woman named Jenna, who was recently given a hard time for wearing jean shorts to church. A woman followed Jenna into the bathroom and proceeded to call her "too fat" to wear her outfit of choice.

Jenna posted the video of the incident on Twitter. "This women followed me into the bathroom and attacked me calling me fat and that I couldn't wear jean shorts because I was too fat," wrote Jenna. Jenna said she filmed the video so that she could show her paster what had happened to her.


Jenna said she was reluctant to come back to her church because of the scolding she received. "I'm honestly shocked and upset that this happened at church," Jenna wrote in a follow up post on Twitter. "I should feel accepted and loved and now I don't want to go back to that church."

Jenna also posted a photo of the outfit she was wearing, which is honestly not that bad.


"I just want to say that I know I am not perfect!!! But I would never attack someone and tear someone down like what she did to me….," Jenna Tweeted.

The pastor sent out a letter to the church as a result of the shorts shaming, which Jenna also posted on Twitter. "We are shocked and saddened by this act. The Church is supposed to be a place of safety, love, and acceptance," the letter says. "We are currently working to assure that nothing like this will happen again."


The woman has been appropriately disciplined for her inappropriate behavior. Before she gave Jenna a hard time over her ensemble, the woman had been a leader in the church. That has now changed. "My pastor said that she will never be able to be on any sort of committee/any leadership role in our church ever again," Jenna said.

Many people came to Jenna's defense on Twitter, including Jameela Jamil.





God more than likely doesn't have strong opinions on who should and shouldn't wear denim. The Bible doesn't say, "Thou shalt not wear jean shorts unless thou art a size 4."

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