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Carrie Fisher takes down body-shamers in just 2 tweets.

The world can always count on Carrie Fisher to tell it like it is.

Carrie Fisher takes down body-shamers in just 2 tweets.

For nearly four decades, the world has best known Carrie Fisher for her role as Princess Leia.

In that same span, she's also been a best-selling novelist and memoirist and, just generally, one of the most open and honest voices in all of Hollywood.


Fisher as Princess Leia from "Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi." Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images.

But after some scrutiny over her appearance in the latest film, she's got a message for her critics: Stop.

Taking to Twitter, Fisher called out body-shamers, writing, “Please stop debating about whether or not I aged well. Unfortunately, it hurts all three of my feelings. My body hasn’t aged as well as I have. Blow us.”


“Youth and beauty are not accomplishments, they’re the temporary happy by-products of time and/or DNA," she added.


In a recent interview, Fisher said she felt pressure to lose weight for the new film.

"They don’t want to hire all of me — only about three-quarters! Nothing changes: it’s an appearance-driven thing," she tells Good Housekeeping about feeling pressured to lose 35 pounds to reprise her role. "I’m in a business where the only thing that matters is weight and appearance. That is so messed up. They might as well say get younger, because that’s how easy it is."

In some recently resurfaced promotional pictures from 1983's "Return of the Jedi," Fisher — who had originally been asked to get down to 95 pounds for the role — is seen splashing around in water. This despite the fact that the scene in which she wears this outfit happens to occur on a desert planet. (But why let details get in the way of sexualization, right?)


Her male co-stars — Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford — haven't received nearly as much criticism.

Men are allowed to age. Women, on the other hand — not so much. While Hamill joined Fisher in undergoing a weight-loss regimen for the new movies, neither he nor Ford were given the same level of public criticism as Fisher. (Don't read the comments on any article about Fisher discussing her weight. Trust me.)

Ford, Hamill, and Fisher promoting "Star Wars: The Force Awakens." Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney.

Regardless of what you think of her weight or appearance, she absolutely rocked "The Force Awakens."

And shouldn't that be what matters?

Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.