Mom and blogger Mary Katherine Backstrom regularly shares snippets of life with her two children on her Facebook page. One particularly touching interaction with her daughter is melting hearts and blowing minds due to the three-year-old's wise words about forgiveness.

Even adults struggle with the concept of forgiveness. Entire books have been written about how and why to forgive those who have wronged us, but many still have a hard time getting it. Who would guess that a preschooler could encapsulate what forgiveness means in a handful of innocent words?

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Family

You've just been through the most physically demanding and life-altering event you'll ever experience. You have been stretched, pushed, pulled, and ravaged in seemingly superhuman ways to bring your baby into the world. Your altered body prepares to feed and slowly begins to heal, causing your hormones to ricochet through you like pinballs.

And on top of all of that, you are suddenly thrust into an entirely new role, a tiny life placed in your full-time care—a life that doesn't sleep regularly and requires specific methods of feeding every few hours around the clock.

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Recommended

It's amazing how much positive change we can create in our lives if we just allow ourselves to do so. Embracing new responsibilities and values is a big part of growing older, as is rethinking how and why we admire ourselves.

Laura Mazza, who goes by the name The Mum on the Run on social media and her blog, posted a powerful photo of how having three children changed how she values herself and her body.


She posted a revealing before-and-after photos on social media and expressed how going from a rail-thin girl with a "high belly button" and "protruding bones" made her feel more valuable when she was younger. She also expressed how difficult it was to accept her new body after having three children.

But eventually she learned not only to accept her new body but love it for all its incredible accomplishments.

Her comments on her Facebook post of the same photo, which has since been deleted, are a wonderful window into the mind of a mother as she looks to her past while embracing the present.

"I remember people asking me what my exercise routine was," she wrote about the picture of her younger self. "They admired me. I admired me! I bought a whole new wardrobe. I was so proud. I showed off my body."

Then, she reflected on the photo of herself now. "Stretch marks. A droopy belly button. Thicker, not many bones protruding, but more dimples that represent cellulite," she wrote.

But Mazza eventually changed how she perceives her new body by appreciating all of the blessings it has given her. "I have achieved more with this body, than I have with my old body," she wrote. I've eaten more good foods. I've lived more, I've given more, I've enjoyed more. I've made life. This body, THIS body should be celebrated and admired."

She ended her post with a great tongue-and-cheek-observation: "Love makes you fat."

Here's the whole post.

via Mum on the Run / Facebook

via Mum on the Run / Facebook

via Mum on the Run / Facebook

via Mum on the Run / Facebook

via Mum on the Run / Facebook

Her post wasn't just therapeutic for herself, it inspired countless mothers who've had the same experience.

via The Mum on the Run / Facebook

They thought her post was courageous.

via The Mum on the Run / Facebook

Some mothers could really relate.

via The Mum on the Run / Facebook

Mazza also made really important point on her Instagram post about how her self-perception will influence her daughter's. "What would I say to my daughter?" she asked. "That she is only as good as the number on the scales?"

Well Being

1. Let's say you and your 4-year-old son live in Los Angeles.

You enjoy your life there. Your friends; your family; the balmy, sunny weather; how you meet people of all shades, sexual orientations, and genders. There is no judgment. Difference is normal.

The only thing your graduate degree prepared you to be is a college professor. But competition for jobs is fierce in Los Angeles, so you apply for five professorships around the country. After three rounds of interviews, you are offered an assistant professorship in a faraway Midwestern town that is, you learn after a quick internet search, not nearly as diverse as L.A. But you say yes to the job.

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