US Soccer

The U.S. women's soccer team won the Women's World Cup, but the victory is marred by the fact that the team is currently fighting for equal pay. In soccer, the game is won by scoring points, but the fight for equal pay isn't as clearly winnable and the playing field isn't as even.

We live in a world where winning the World Cup is easier than winning equal pay, but co-captain Megan Rapinoe says there's one easy way fans can support the team: Go see games.

Some people argue the men's team deserves to get paid more because they are more successful and earn more money for the United States Soccer Federation. Pay depends on merchandise and ticket sales, and in general, men's sporting events tend to draw a bigger crowd than women's sporting events. It's not about sex, many argue; it's about the fact that people just prefer to see men play.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture
Michael Vadon

When it comes to attacks from the President on Twitter, no one is safe.

Trump unleashed a firestorm of criticism directed at USWNT star Megan Rapinoe Wednesday after she told reporters she wouldn't visit the White House if her team wins the 2019 Women's World Cup.

"I'm not going to the fucking White House," Rapinoe told Eight by Eight. "We're not going to be invited," the co-captain said in a video from behind the scenes of a cover story shoot for the soccer magazine.

Keep Reading Show less
Recommended

The 2018 World Cup may be over, but the conversations about race and identity are not.

Most recently, German soccer player Mesut Özil is making headlines. Özil has decided to quit playing professionally for the national team after what he describes as experiences of racism and double standards against people with Turkish ancestry.

On July 22, the Turkish-German midfielder posted a statement on Twitter detailing the slander and ridicule he has received from far-right German politicians, the media, the German Football Association (DFB), his team, and soccer fans.

Keep Reading Show less
More

Russia has an abhorrent track record on LGBTQ rights.

While the country technically decriminalized homosexuality after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia took a sharp turn right when President Vladimir Putin's 2013 legislation cracking down on "nontraditional" relationships went into effect. The intentionally vague law bans public demonstrations that aim to expand LGBTQ rights and it prohibits the distribution of LGBTQ-themed material to minors.

In other words, you won't see too many rainbow flags flying around Moscow.

Keep Reading Show less
More