Time to throw your support behind the U.S. women's soccer team. They deserve it.
‌U.S. soccer's Matt Besler after the loss to Trinidad and Tobago. Photo by Abraham Diaz/AFP/Getty Images‌.

When the U.S. men's soccer team was eliminated from this year's World Cup contention, people were devastated. The U.S. Men's National Team's 2-1 loss Wednesday loss to Trinidad and Tobago marked the end of a 31-year run of World Cup appearances by the team (though they've never won).

People ... didn't take it well.


Social media erupted with outrage, along with hot-headed analysis trying to figure out how we could have let this happen.

USA Today even called the loss "the biggest embarrassment in U.S. sports history." Ouch.

Soccer may be less of a national pastime in America than football or baseball, but for fans of the sport in the U.S., this was an apocalyptic moment that had them questioning the very future of soccer in our country.

Meanwhile, America's uber-talented and successful women's soccer team is just over here like: "Hi."

"Remember us?"

U.S. soccer's Magan Rapinoe would like to say Hi. Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images

Yes, the U.S. Women's National Team, which ran away with the 2015 World Cup and has an excellent shot at qualifying for the 2019 tournament.

Yes, the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team that earns about a quarter of what their male colleagues do.

Yes, the U.S. Women's National Team that brings in similar revenue to the men's team when you factor in their recent successes.

Yes, the U.S. Women's National Team that consistently gets far worse training resources, food, and lodging than the men's team.

Yes, the U.S. Women's National Team that, despite the inequalities listed above, responded with grace and dignity as their fellow athletes suffered a crushing loss:

Yes, the U.S. Women's National Team that, simply put, kicks ass.

They're still around, gearing up for another World Cup run next year. And they deserve to be more than an afterthought in the conversation about American soccer.

It's disappointing to see the men's team knocked out of contention, but this is the perfect opportunity to support America's real top soccer players.

There are a lot of great conversations to be had about how more diverse athletes can get a fair shake at playing at soccer's highest level. But right now, there are already some terrific American players gearing up for an international showdown. They deserve the support, admiration, excitement, and — yes — even the money that had been set aside for the men's team.

The U.S. women's team has earned the right to be the face of American soccer. It's time to stop prioritizing our mediocre men's team and let the winning women's team shine.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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