Howard Stern predicted exactly what would happen to Trump as president.

Donald Trump really seems to hate being president. Almost as much as people seem to hate him being president.

In an interview with Reuters, Trump all but acknowledged the painful truth, saying: “I loved my previous life. I had so many things going. This is more work than in my previous life. I thought it would be easier.”

And while the weight of the office has clearly caught Trump off guard, one person who saw it coming from far away was radio host Howard Stern, who has known Trump for decades.


On his show, Stern said he had a conversation with Trump less than two weeks into his candidacy, where he warned him this was not going to end well.

“I really was sincere. I said, ‘Why would you want to be the president of the United States? You're not going to be beloved, it's going to be a f*cking nightmare in your life,’” Stern said.

Sure, that’s easy for anyone to say in hindsight, but Stern basically said the same thing during his show last November, right after Trump shocked the world by winning the election:

“Now, for the next four years of his life—and you don’t know how long you’re going to live—he’s got to sit there and deal with people’s f*cking anger,” Stern said. “Can he give the people what he promised them? Can he really change the economy? Can he really change America? You know this is like a barge. And if things go wrong—not even because of his own fault—and the economy starts to falter, then you’re everybody’s f*cking scumbag. Everyone’s like, ‘F*ck him.’”

Of course, most of Trump’s critics would say his unpopularity is entirely his fault.

After all, he’s the least popular president in modern history, Democrat or Republican.

But Stern isn’t your typical Trump critic. While being very open about the fact that he was supporting Hillary Clinton, Stern said he personally likes Trump and has considered him a friend for many years. Trump attended Stern’s 2008 wedding.

But Stern says the problem for Trump is his “sensitive ego”—a terrible trait to have for any politician in Washington, D.C., where every president is under seemingly constant attack from the media, political opponents, and critics everywhere.

“He stepped into a situation that's really not a win for him," Stern said. "He's a 70-year-old guy, he's got a great life, gorgeous wife, great kids, he's got helicopters, airplanes, all the accoutrements of the great life … so now to step into this f*cking mess, and for what? There are people who are better suited for this kind of thing."

Despite their friendship, Stern hasn’t been shy about offering Trump free advice and/or criticism over the airwaves. Just this week,

Stern famously said the president should fire Sean Spicer, whom he said speaks in “fluent moron.” And we all know how that worked out.

This article originally appeared on GOOD.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.