Howard Stern predicted exactly what would happen to Trump as president.

Donald Trump really seems to hate being president. Almost as much as people seem to hate him being president.

In an interview with Reuters, Trump all but acknowledged the painful truth, saying: “I loved my previous life. I had so many things going. This is more work than in my previous life. I thought it would be easier.”

And while the weight of the office has clearly caught Trump off guard, one person who saw it coming from far away was radio host Howard Stern, who has known Trump for decades.


On his show, Stern said he had a conversation with Trump less than two weeks into his candidacy, where he warned him this was not going to end well.

“I really was sincere. I said, ‘Why would you want to be the president of the United States? You're not going to be beloved, it's going to be a f*cking nightmare in your life,’” Stern said.

Sure, that’s easy for anyone to say in hindsight, but Stern basically said the same thing during his show last November, right after Trump shocked the world by winning the election:

“Now, for the next four years of his life—and you don’t know how long you’re going to live—he’s got to sit there and deal with people’s f*cking anger,” Stern said. “Can he give the people what he promised them? Can he really change the economy? Can he really change America? You know this is like a barge. And if things go wrong—not even because of his own fault—and the economy starts to falter, then you’re everybody’s f*cking scumbag. Everyone’s like, ‘F*ck him.’”

Of course, most of Trump’s critics would say his unpopularity is entirely his fault.

After all, he’s the least popular president in modern history, Democrat or Republican.

But Stern isn’t your typical Trump critic. While being very open about the fact that he was supporting Hillary Clinton, Stern said he personally likes Trump and has considered him a friend for many years. Trump attended Stern’s 2008 wedding.

But Stern says the problem for Trump is his “sensitive ego”—a terrible trait to have for any politician in Washington, D.C., where every president is under seemingly constant attack from the media, political opponents, and critics everywhere.

“He stepped into a situation that's really not a win for him," Stern said. "He's a 70-year-old guy, he's got a great life, gorgeous wife, great kids, he's got helicopters, airplanes, all the accoutrements of the great life … so now to step into this f*cking mess, and for what? There are people who are better suited for this kind of thing."

Despite their friendship, Stern hasn’t been shy about offering Trump free advice and/or criticism over the airwaves. Just this week,

Stern famously said the president should fire Sean Spicer, whom he said speaks in “fluent moron.” And we all know how that worked out.

This article originally appeared on GOOD.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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