On January 17, 400 migrants seeking asylum helped dig a tunnel underneath the border wall between Mexico and the United States. They immediately turned themselves over to U.S. Customs authorities.

The willingness of these migrants, including an estimated 200 children, shows both the desperation of those seeking asylum but also the fundamental decency of those same people who turned themselves in upon crossing the border.

In fact, their actions are so inspiring they remind us of a little speech Trump gave in 2004 in which he literally talked about climbing over, under and around the walls that are put in front of us.

For every Trump statement, there's an equal and opposite previous statement.


It's basically scientific law that for everything our current president says, something he previously said directly counters or contradicts it. The people of the internet have made a game out of finding Trump tweets that don't age well (here are 31 examples, just for funsies) and one entrepreneur even created now-sold-out flip flops with contradicting Trump tweets printed on them.

Good times, America!

"I wanted to highlight this hypocrisy," said the creator of the flip flops.

Posted by INVENTIONS INSIDER on Wednesday, January 2, 2019

A newly unearthed video gem makes Trump's arguments for his "big, beautiful wall" sound even sillier than they already do.

For two plus years, we've heard Trump go on and on about the necessity of building a wall along the entire Mexico-U.S. border, which Mexico was (somehow, miraculously) going to pay for. Though he's now conceded that steel slats are a better choice for a barrier, much of his push was for a "big" and "beautiful" wall made of concrete—which makes archived footage from a commencement speech he gave in 2004 all the more hilarious.

In a clip shared by The Daily Show, Trump described to graduates of Wagner College how people should never get up, no matter what obstacles they come across—including a concrete wall.

"Never, ever give up," Trump said. "Don't give up. Don't allow it to happen. If there's a concrete wall in front of you, go through it, go over it, go around it. But get to the other side of that wall."

Excuse me, but BWAAAAHHAAAHAHHAAAAA!

Oh man, once Trump gets his wall he better hope no one shows Mexico this old video we found.

Posted by The Daily Show on Wednesday, January 9, 2019

All hilarity aside, there are real reasons a wall won't do what the president claims it will do.

Much has been analyzed and written about the potential efficacy of and problems with "the wall," by much more qualified and knowledgable folks than myself. For example:

- Why the Wall Won't Work by David Bier, immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute’s Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity. (The Cato Institute is a Libertarian think tank.)

- 5 Problems 'the Wall' Won't Solve by Michael Dear, emeritus professor in the College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley

- I voted for Trump. Now his wall may destroy my butterfly paradise. by Luciano Guerra, outreach coordinator and educator for the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas.

To sum up for the TL;DR folks, the wall won't solve the problems Trump claims it will. Most hard drugs are snuck through ports of entry not brought over the open areas of the border, terrorists are simply not coming in through the southern border, human trafficking is a much more complex reality than a wall can possibly address, and most research shows that immigrants both documented and undocumented are actually less likely to commit crimes than American citizens are.

Not to mention, illegal crossings have been on a serious and steady decline since the early 2000s, and are actually at a 46-year low.

Image via factcheck.org.

There is no "flooding" of the border, despite the fear mongering rhetoric we hear from the White House. There are issues with immigration that need to be addressed, but building an expensive, environmentally damaging, largely ineffective eyesore is not the way to address them.

Not to mention, if people take Trump's own advice about getting through or over a wall no matter what it takes to get to the other side, there's no way it will work at even a very basic, purpose-of-a-wall level.

Instead of investing in a wall, let's put that money into meaningful immigration reform that reflects an understanding of the complexities of human migration and respects our identity as a nation of opportunity and diversity.

via alyssa360style / Instagram

One of the most amazing (and frightening) realizations one can have as a parent is that your child is always listening and they have incredible memories.

Alyssia, the mother of three-year-old Ayaan, was blown away when during their walk to school he began reciting positive affirmations she taught him a year earlier. When he was two she taught him to repeat "I am smart. I am blessed. I can do anything," when he is stressed.

"Well he shocked me this morning. Out of no where he started repeating it, so I pulled out my phone," Alyssia commented on her Instagram post. "He ended (with enthusiasm lol) once we made it to our destination. So proud of the little boy he is growing into."

Alyssia shared the video on Instagram where it received nearly 100,000 likes.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less

"There's only one thing more dangerous than a bad virus, and that's a bad vaccine," Dr. Mike Ryan, executive director of WHO's health emergencies programme, said in March. "We have to be very, very, very careful in developing any product that we're going to inject into potentially most of the world population."

Since the beginning of the pandemic, experts have said that developing a vaccine and getting it through the necessary safety and efficacy protocols would take, at minimum, 12 to 18 months. Yet here we are, 7 months in, and Vladimir Putin has just announced that Russia has already approved a vaccine for the coronavirus.

According to the BBC, there are more than 100 vaccines in various stages of development and testing. Six of those have reached phase 3 trials, involving more widespread testing in humans. Russia's vaccine is not among those six.

Meanwhile, hundreds of U.S. doctors have signed a letter urging the FDA not to rush or politicize vaccine trials.

Keep Reading Show less