Trevor Noah responded beautifully to the French ambassador who accused him of racism.

It's no secret that the majority of the French national soccer team that competed at the 2018 World Cup is of African descent.

Paul Pogba, Kylian Mbappe, and Adil Rami are just a few names of players who are children of African immigrants.

So it was fitting when Trevor Noah celebrated their ancestry with a light-hearted joke: "Africa won the World Cup!" But the witty remark didn't bode well for French Ambassador Gérard Araud.


Seemingly insulted by Noah's joke, the French ambassador wrote a long letter lambasting him for denying the team's "Frenchness."

Araud's letter included arguments like "I heard your words about an African victory; nothing could be less true" and "unlike in the United States of America, France does not refer to its citizens based on their race, religion, or origin."

But Noah had the most beautiful (and perfect) clap back to the ambassador's letter.

On Wednesday, July 18, in his "Between the Scenes" clip available only online, Noah read Araud's letter out loud and refuted his accusation.

"When I'm saying they're African, I'm not saying it as a way to exclude them from their Frenchness, but I’m rather using it to include them in my African-ness,” Noah said. "I'm saying, 'I see you, my French brother of African descent.'"

Noah specifically took issue with Araud's underlying point that celebrating the players' African ancestry meant denying their French identity.

"Why can’t they be both?" Noah rhetorically asked. "Why is that duality only afforded to a select group of people? What they’re arguing here is in order to be French, you have to erase everything that is African?”

The ambassador went on to write "roots are an individual identity" and that celebrating the winning team as "African" legitimizes the belief that whiteness is the "only definition of being French."

Noah pointed out, however, that French politicians only seem to consider African immigrants as "French" when they score a goal or save a baby from a balcony. But when discussing French residents in a negative light, these politicians refer to it as an African immigrant problem.

"I love how African they are and how French they are," he said. "I don’t take their Frenchness away, but I also don’t think we need to take their African-ness away.”

Noah went on to say that one of the great things about America is that people here can celebrate being both Irish and American during St. Patrick's Day, black and American during Juneteenth, Chinese and American during the Chinese New Year, and/or Puerto Rican and American during the Puerto Rican parade.

A tolerant and diverse society isn't just about celebrating what we all have in common. It's also about celebrating what makes us different.

There's strength and inclusion in acknowledging our differences, and Noah's remarks remind us of that.

“Black people all over the world were celebrating the African-ness of the French players ... in a positive way, going, ‘Look at these Africans who can become French,’” he said.  

Regardless of whether or not the French ambassador is offended by the celebration of the World Cup winning team's African background, Noah will still praise their African identity.

"If French people are saying they cannot be both, then I think they have a problem—not me,” he stated.

He is certainly right.

Wear your values with products from PSA Supply Co., an independent site owned by our parent company, GOOD Worldwide Inc. GOOD makes money when you buy these products, and 10% of profits go to The Center for Community Change Action. Use discount code UPWORTHY to get 15% off your first order!
via Noti Tolum / Facebook

A group of beachgoers in Mexico proved that when people join together and stand up for justice, you can triumph in even the direst of circumstances.

Municipal police in Tulum, Quintana Roo got received a tip that there were men allegedly committing "immoral acts" on the beach. So the officers, armed with AR-15 rifles, picked up two Canadian men.

"The officers approached a group of young foreigners," local politician Maritza Escalante Morales recounted in her video. "After about 20 minutes passed, a patrol car arrived and proceeded to arrest them with handcuffs."

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

Keep Reading Show less

This story was originally published on The Mighty.

Most people imagine depression equals “really sad,” and unless you’ve experienced depression yourself, you might not know it goes so much deeper than that. Depression expresses itself in many different ways, some more obvious than others. While some people have a hard time getting out of bed, others might get to work just fine — it’s different for everyone.

Keep Reading Show less
via @jharrisfour / Twitter

The 2021 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) kicked off in Orlando, Florida on Friday. It's three days of panels and speakers with former President Donald Trump delivering the keynote speech on Sunday night.

It's believed that during the speech Trump will declare himself the Republican frontrunner for the 2024 nomination.

So far, the event has made headlines for a speech by Senator Ted Cruz of Texas who tried his hand at stand-up comedy. "I've got to say, Orlando is awesome," Cruz told the cheering crowd. "It's not as nice as Cancun. But it's nice."

Keep Reading Show less