Instead of going to Disney World, a 6-year-old used his money to help Hurricane Dorian evacuees

Disney World might be the Happiest Place on Earth, but for one little boy, it took a backseat to helping others.

Six-year-old Jermaine Bell had been saving up money to go to Disney World's Animal Kingdom park for his 7th birthday, but he decided it would be better spent helping those trying to flee from Hurricane Dorian.

The hurricane is expected to hit South Carolina as a Category 2 storm, with winds of up to 102 miles per hour. South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster ordered a mandatory evacuation for those living on the coast of the Palmetto state, and the South Carolina DPS officials estimate around 360,000 residents and tourists have evacuated the state so far. The storm surge is the biggest danger, and Charleston has already experienced flooding.

Bell stayed in Allendale, South Carolina (about 90 miles west of Charleston) and stood alongside Highway 125 offering evacuees chips, hot dogs, and water. He held a handmade sign to let those trying to escape from the hurricane know he was there to help. On his first day out, which was Labor Day, Bell served more than 100 people. But he told CNN he served "a lot" more later on.



RELATED: Snow White soothing a boy having an 'autism meltdown' will make you believe in Disney magic

"The people that are traveling to go to places, I wanted them to have some food to eat, so they can enjoy the ride to the place that they're going to stay at," Bell told WJBF. "I wanted to be generous and live to give." It's pretty solid reasoning. This kid is only six, and already he's figured out that the best present you can receive is that which you give to someone else.

Food and water aren't the only things Bell had to offer. "He actually even prayed for a family while they were here in reference to their house being OK when they got back, so that was really tear dropping," his grandmother, Aretha Grant, told WJBF. Grant also helped Bell pass out food to the evacuees.

Bell impressed even his own family. "I am very proud," Grant told CNN. "We knew Jermaine was very special, but we didn't know he was special in this way to be such a giver like this." His mother, Lauren, took to Facebook to share the story of her son's generosity. "He has a very big heart and all-around caring spirit," Lauren wrote, according to Fox 35 Orlando. "It definitely makes it a birthday to remember for him."

RELATED: A woman in the Bahamas took in nearly 100 stray dogs to save them from Hurricane Dorian

Hurricane Dorian shut down Disney World for a day, but has since reopened and Bell hasn't given up on his plans to go to the park. Once Hurricane Dorian has dissipated, Bell wants to "go Animal Kingdom and see lots of lions and have a Lion King party," he told WJBF. His mother still plans on taking him on the trip.

Bell turns seven on September 8th, but his generosity and selflessness go beyond his years.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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via Pexels and @drjoekort / TikTok

Gay sex and relationships therapist Dr. Joe Kort is causing a stir on TikTok where he explains why straight men who have sex with men can still be considered straight. If a man has sex with a man doesn't it ultimately make him gay or bisexual?

According to Kort, there can be a big chasm between our sexual and romantic orientations.

"Straight men can be attracted to the sex act, but not to the man. Straight men having sex with men doesn't cancel somebody's heterosexuality any more than a straight woman having sex with a woman cancels her [heterosexuality]," he says in the video.

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Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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OK, sure, there are no assigned seats, but you've been sitting at the same desk since the first day and everyone knows it.

So why does the guy who sits next to you put his phone, his book, his charger, his lunch, and his laptop in the space that's rightfully yours? It's annoying!

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Controversy has been brewing for months at the University of Texas at Austin as student-athletes petitioned the school to stop playing the school's alma mater song, "The Eyes of Texas."

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That's not all. The song is set to the tune "I've Been Workin' On the Railroad," which has its own questionable origins, and according to the Austin American-Statesman, "The song debuted at a Varsity minstrel show, a fundraiser for UT athletics, and was at some points performed by white singers in blackface." (Minstrel shows were a long, disturbing part of America's history of racism, in which white performers made themselves into caricatures of Black people and Black performers acted out cartoonish stereotypes in order to entertain audiences.)

This summer, in the midst of nationwide protests against racial injustice, students at the university launched a petition asking the school to confront its historic ties with the Confederacy in the names of buildings on campus and to formally acknowledge the racial roots of the alma mater song. A second student petition asked the school to replace the song with one that didn't have "racist undertones" in an attempt "to make Texas more comfortable and inclusive for the black athletes and the black community that has so fervently supported this program."

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