6 things to know about this year's Women's World Cup even if you're not a sports fan.

The U.S. goes for their third World Cup championship when they take on Japan on July 5.

This year's Women's World Cup has been nothing short of awesome.

Close games, unbelievable goals, and last-minute heroics have been written all over this year's tournament. As seems to always be the case, Team USA is dominating. (The women's team's dominance is a nice counter-balance to the men's team's sometimes less-than-awesome results.)

Even if you've missed some of it, here are six things you should know about the 2015 U.S. women's national team going into the game.


Team USA celebrates after beating Germany in the semifinals on June 30, 2015, looking as chill as possible. Photo by Francois Laplante/FreestylePhoto/Getty Images.

1. The U.S. defense is just totally, unstoppably impenetrable.

The team hasn't given up a goal since the 27th minute of their first round game against Australia. Going into the final, that's 513 consecutive minutes of play without giving up a goal!

Hope Solo punches the ball away during the June 12, 2015, game against Sweden. Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images.

2. Everybody scores the points! No ball-hogging here.

When it comes to scoring goals, Team USA is all about sharing the wealth. Going into Sunday's final, Carli Lloyd has three goals, Megan Rapinoe has two, and Alex Morgan, Abby Wambach, Christen Press, and Kelley O'Hara each have one. When it comes to putting points on the board, these players are scrappy and spread the ball around.

Kelley O'Hara (left) celebrates scoring a goal in the June 30, 2015, semifinal match against Germany. Photo by Franck Fife/AFP/Getty Images.

3. It's probably the last World Cup for scoring legend Abby Wambach.

The 35-year-old forward is the all-time U.S. leader in goals scored in international play, with 183, and Sunday's game might be the last time Abby Wambach will take the field in a World Cup match. This may be your last chance to see her in action!

Abby Wambach walks out to the field before taking on Germany on June 30, 2015. Photo by Elsa/Getty Images.

When she set the record in June 2013 with her 159th goal, previous record holder Mia Hamm offered congratulations.

4. The team is an inspiring model of inclusiveness in sports.

There are four out lesbian or bisexual members of the team, including head coach Jill Ellis and players Ali Krieger, Megan Rapinoe, and Abby Wambach. As sports tend not to be havens of LGBT inclusion, Team USA has some much-needed representation.

Megan Rapinoe celebrates after the win against Germany. Photo by Franck Fife/AFP/Getty Images.

5. They've been here before (1991 and 1999 champions)!

The U.S. team came home victorious in both the 1991 and 1999 World Cup, which drove a generation of young girls into soccer.

The 1991 team featured legends like Mia Hamm, Julie Foudy, and Michelle Akers, as well as some incredible '90s style. Photo by Tommy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images.

The team has been nothing short of dominant — they have never finished lower than third. (The U.S. men's national team, on the other hand, has finished in the top three just once in 20 World Cup tournaments — in 1930.)

6. For the first time in Women's World Cup history, the final will be a rematch!

Just four years ago, the U.S. lost in a heartbreaking final match to Japan, decided on penalty kicks. On Sunday, the teams will line up again with the championship on the line.

In 2011, Japan won the World Cup by defeating the U.S. 3-1 in a shootout after finishing tied 2-2. Photo by Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images.

There so many reasons to cheer in this game. Good luck, Team USA!

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