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Teens continue on with sweet breakfast tradition for a grandmother who lost her grandson

After Sam's tragic passing, the "breakfast club" was determined to keep his memory alive.

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There's a reason why they call it comfort food

One day, a teen boy named Sam Crowe told his grandma Peggy Winckowski that he had been bragging about her cooking to his friends, saying “my grandma makes the best breakfast.”

“Grandma Peggy,” as she’s universally known, invited the group over to try one of her legendary breakfasts, and the following week she was greeted by Sam, his cousin Owen and seven of their school friends—all of whom enjoyed an extraordinary meal, along with a round of hugs.

One morning meetup led to another, and thus their makeshift breakfast club was born. Every Wednesday morning, Grandma Peggy would prepare a lavish meal for a larger and larger group. This tradition lasted throughout the year.

Then, tragedy struck.
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Photo pulled from YouTube video

Animated short about closeted love.

After a much anticipation, the animated kids short "In a Heartbeat" was finally released on July 31, 2017.

The four-minute short film — which follows a closeted boy as he "runs the risk of being outed by his own heart after it pops out of his chest to chase down the boy of his dreams" — captivated certain corners of the internet once its trailer was released in May and instantly went viral.

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Family

Why some parents' misunderstanding of 'soiling the nest' could be excusing unacceptable behavior

Late teen years can be hard, but some parents are excusing extreme bad behavior as a developmental stage.

Misunderstanding 'soiling the nest' could be excusing bad behaviors.

If you have older teens and frequent mom groups, you've probably heard of the term "soiling the nest." Sure, there may be plenty of parents who don't know the term, but as someone who belongs to a few social media groups geared toward parents of teens and young adults, I can assure you a lot of parents know it and are misusing it to explain some really poor behaviors.

So what is "soiling the nest"? It's a term used in psychology and child development that encompasses the stage between the last few months of high school and heading off to college. Teens tend to become moodier, more distant and quite frankly, they get on your nerves.

Lots of big life changes are coming up, so they're stressed, nervous and overwhelmed about leaving home. To make the transition a bit easier, they start pushing away from their family unit so as to not miss them as much.

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@girlscouts/Twitter

What a fabulous resource

The Girl Scouts' guide to help parents talk to their daughters about weight and body image is kind of amazing.

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