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A PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM UPWORTHY
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Randy Rainbow made a name for himself launching hilarious parodies during the Trump presidency, as he brilliantly transformed musical theater canon into political theater cannons. He's also helped many of us get through the past year of the pandemic by changing classic musical hits like "Gee, Officer Krupke" and "Put on a Happy Face" to "Gee, Anthony Fauci" and "Cover Your Freakin' Face."

Some of us have wondered if the comedian would have enough material to keep up this kind of comedy in the post-Trump era, but there was no need to worry. Today, he released his first Biden-themed parody since the inauguration, and it is simply delightful.

Randy kicks the video off joking about his post-Trump comedy challenges, saying to President Biden, "Could you maybe at some point just, like, curse or say something completely loony tunes or offensive? The other guy used to do that, and it just made this whole thing a little funnier."


After lightly poking fun of Biden's middle name, dozing off while the president talked about the vaccine situation, then having a momentary nightmare, Randy starts belting some impressive 1950s Chordettes harmony to the tune of "Mr. Sandman":

Mr. Biden

Bring my vaccine

Keep me protected from COVID-19

Tell me the trick to how I might earn a

Fix of that magic Pfizer or Moderna

Biden

Gimme a poke

They call you "sleepy" but you're pretty woke

I'm so tired of quarantine

Mr. Biden, bring my vaccine...

(It's way better when you listen to it.)

Enjoy:

Randy speaks to what so many of us are feeling right now, as we see the finish line with the country poised to have enough vaccines for every adult by the end of May. It'll take months more to actually get shots in everyone's arms, and for many of us, our turn cannot come quickly enough. After a year of diligently wearing masks and staying distanced, we're ready for all the hugs, and all the friends over for dinner, and all the travel, and all the normal life things we will never again take for granted.

And when "The Robinettes" sang "Oh, I might murder someone if I see another Zoom"? I don't know about you, but I felt that in my bones.

And wanting to plant a big ol' kiss on Dr. Fauci? Felt that too. Speaking of which, if you missed this one it's also worth a viewing:

Randy Rainbow has earned himself the title of King of Parody these past few years, and fans are sharing their hopes that he'll receive some kind of formal recognition for his talents. The Mark Twain for American Humor has been bandied about as an idea, which seems perfectly fitting since Twain himself was a satirist and parodist.

Even during the darkest times, laughter is healing. Thanks, Randy Rainbow, for helping provide it during a difficult era. Glad to see you'll still be with us as we turn the corner into (hopefully) better days.

In her spoken word piece, "How Many More?" Lula Saleh shines a light on the treacherous journeys refugees endure and their uncertain futures if they survive the trip.

‌Throughout her stirring piece, equal parts poem and song, Saleh questions not just governments turning away refugees at their borders, but everyone who turns a blind eye to human suffering. ‌‌‌‌

All GIFs from Infiniti Pictures/Vimeo.


Saleh is the  daughter of immigrants and an immigrant herself, so this message is deeply personal.

Saleh is an Ethiopian-Eritrean American and spent her childhood on four different continents, so her global perspective and life as a third-culture kid informs much of her work.

Whether or not you're an immigrant, her words are poignant, thought-provoking, and more relevant than ever.

The powerful images accompanying Saleh's words also highlight an often overlooked refugee population — displaced people from sub-Saharan Africa.

With continuing crises in South Sudan, Nigeria, and the Central African Republic, and recent conflicts in Burundi and Yemen, sub-Saharan Africa now hosts more than 18 million refugees. That's more than 26% of the world's refugee population.

Additionally, millions of people throughout the continent are also displaced within their own countries due to natural disasters, ongoing violence, and conflicts. In 2015, an estimated 12 million people in 21 African countries experienced ongoing displacement. In Nigeria alone, the figure reached 1.8 million people displaced at the end of 2016.

‌Refugee children from South Sudan in Bidibidi resettlement camp in the Northern District of Yumbe, Uganda. Photo by Isaa Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images. ‌

While much of the world's attention has gone to the refugee population fleeing war-torn Syria and Libya, journeying to western Europe, it's important to remember and support organizations providing emergency shelters, supplies, education, and medical care to refugees and displaced people across Africa as well.

This is a global problem that will require thoughtful, compassionate solutions. There's enough passion, energy, and heart to go around.

‌A woman carries a flour sack during food distribution by the Catholic Church to refugees and displaced people in Juba, South Sudan. Photo by Samir Bol/AFP/Getty Images. ‌