31 Days of Happiness Countdown: 'Billy on the Street' asks a hilarious question. (Day 7)

Hello and welcome to Day 7 of Upworthy's 31 Days of Happiness Countdown! Each day between Dec. 1 and Dec. 31, we're sharing stories we hope will bring joy, smiles, and laughter into our lives and yours. It's been a challenging year for a lot of us, so why not end it on a high note with a bit of happiness? Check back tomorrow for another installment!

Life is full of tough choices. Chicken or beef? Paper or plastic? To be or not to be?


But there is perhaps no choice more agonizing than the one former TruTV host Billy Eichner posed to one oddly blasé New Yorker last December on a sidewalk outside Manhattan's Madison Square Park:

"Rizzoli or Isles?"

I don't want to ruin the surprise, so I'll only preface the two minutes of sheer delight you're about to experience with the following:

1. You don't have to be a fan of the eponymous recently canceled, long-running TNT crime drama (because ... honestly, who was?) to enjoy the mildly NSFW game show segment.

2. In fact, it's probably better if you weren't.

3. The best part is watching both Eichner and his guest try their hardest not to laugh — and fail.

4. Wait for the prize at the end. You won't be disappointed.

5. If you're anything like me, it will make you giggle like a baby.

Happy holidays, Isles. (A: Rizzoli!)

"Billy on the Street" is on hiatus, but you can watch more here.  

More days of happiness here: DAY 1 / DAY 2 / DAY 3 / DAY 4 / DAY 5 / DAY 6 / [DAY 7] / DAY 8 / DAY 9 / DAY 10 / DAY 11 / DAY 12 / DAY 13 / DAY 14 / DAY 15 / DAY 16 / DAY 17 / DAY 18 / DAY 19 / DAY 20 / DAY 21 / DAY 22 / DAY 23 / DAY 24 / DAY 25 / DAY 26 / DAY 27 / DAY 28 / DAY 29 / DAY 30 / DAY 31
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