31 Days of Happiness Countdown: a girl's super funny interview with her cat. (Day 30)

Thanks for stopping by for Day 30 of Upworthy's 31 Days of Happiness Countdown! If this is your first visit, here's the gist: Each day between Dec. 1 and Dec. 31, we're sharing stories we hope will bring joy, smiles, and laughter into our lives and yours. It's been a challenging year for a lot of us, so why not end it on a high note with a bit of happiness? Check back tomorrow (or click the links at the bottom) for another installment!

"Cat Person," the uncomfortably relevant short story from The New Yorker, was the viral hit of the holiday season. This ... is not that.


This is, however, another piece of cat-related content that really, really, really deserves your undivided attention right now. Instead of making you queasy or hitting too close to home, this one will bring you oodles of sheer unbridled joy.

Earlier this year, a 10-year-old girl named Gabi decided to sit down and interview her cat, Coco, which is a totally normal thing to do. She then transcribed that interview, and it is honestly one of the best pieces of journalism I've read this year.

Her dad, Paul Duane, tweeted a photo of Gabi's hilarious transcription, and it went viral. For obvious reasons.

Interview with Coco!!!

ME: Coco, can I rub you on the head?

COCO: Absolutely

ME: The back?

COCO: Sure.

ME: The tummy?

COCO: YOU-ARE-FORBIDDEN-TO-EVER-TOUCH-MY-TUMMY!!!

ME: The legs?

COCO: NO!!!

ME: The tail?

COCO: ABSOLUTELY NOT!

ME: The butt?

COCO: IS THERE SOMETHING WRONG WITH YOU?!?! THIS INTERVIEW IS OVER!!!























The single tweet racked up over 62,000 retweets and nearly 200,000 Likes, making Gabi and Coco major internet celebs.

According to her father, Gabi was pretty pumped about all the attention and seemingly hopes to springboard her 15 minutes of fame into some kind of literary career.

Kids really know how to ask the tough questions, don't they?

Props to Gabi for bringing us all a much-needed laugh as 2017 draws to a close. This girl is truly going places.

More days of happiness here: DAY 1 / DAY 2 / DAY 3 / DAY 4 / DAY 5/ DAY 6 / DAY 7 / DAY 8 / DAY 9 / DAY 10 / DAY 11 / DAY 12 / DAY 13 / DAY 14 / DAY 15 / DAY 16 / DAY 17/ DAY 18 / DAY 19 / DAY 20 / DAY 21 / DAY 22 / DAY 23 / DAY 24 / DAY 25 / DAY 26 / DAY 27 / DAY 28 / DAY 29 / [DAY 30] / DAY 31
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