31 Days of Happiness Countdown: Carrie Fisher's dog is in the new 'Star Wars.' (Day 13)

Thanks for stopping by for Day 13 of Upworthy's 31 Days of Happiness Countdown! Each day between Dec. 1 and Dec. 31, we're sharing stories we hope will bring joy, smiles, and laughter into our lives and yours. It's been a challenging year for a lot of us, so why not end it on a high note, with a bit of happiness? Check back tomorrow for another installment!

This red carpet stud is Gary Fisher.

Photo by Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images.


If that floppy tongue looks familiar, that's because Gary was Carrie Fisher's therapy dog.

She adored him. And she always brought him along for the ride.

Photo by Daniel Boczarski/Getty Images for Wizard World.

Fisher, who lived openly with bipolar disorder and died at age 60 last year, said Gary had always been a soothing presence by her side. “Gary is very devoted to me and that calms me down,” she told the Sarasota Herald-Tribune in 2013. “He’s anxious when he’s away from me.”

But Gary, who reportedly now lives with Fisher's former assistant, is staying in the spotlight. He's even starring in the new film, "Star Wars: The Last Jedi," which Fisher filmed before she passed away. And honestly, he looks as cute as can be ... for galaxy far, far away standards, at least.

Someone spotted a wrinkly four-legged alien in a sneak-peek image of the new film and asked, "Wait, is that Gary?"

Clair Henry of the "Star Wars" fan site Fantha Tracks tweeted at director Rian Johnson, asking if the "cute little creature" was, in fact, Fisher's old pup.

Here's that pic a little bit closer.

Image via Clair Henry/Twitter.

Johnson spotted her tweet and confirmed: Yep, that's him!

(Granted, it definitely looks like Gary had been through the makeup and prosthetics department.)

Gary, you're a silver screen star!

GIF via NBC's "Today."

Fans are feeling lots of emotions over the latest "Star Wars" film — the last time Fisher's General Leia Organa will grace cinema screens. For millions, Fisher was more than just a princess all these decades: She was a fighter, fierce friend, and an outspoken advocate for combating the stigma surrounding mental illness. She helped so many people simply be themselves.

It's wonderful to know that part of her lives on in her best furry little friend.

More days of happiness here: DAY 1 / DAY 2 / DAY 3 / DAY 4 / DAY 5 / DAY 6 / DAY 7 / DAY 8 / DAY 9 / DAY 10 / DAY 11 / DAY 12 / [DAY 13] / DAY 14 / DAY 15 / DAY 16 / DAY 17 / DAY 18 / DAY 19 / DAY 20 / DAY 21 / DAY 22 / DAY 23 / DAY 24 / DAY 25 / DAY 26 / DAY 27 / DAY 28 / DAY 29 / DAY 30 / DAY 31
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via Pexels.com

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via msleja / TikTok

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