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I Never Got How Dyslexia Works Or What It Looks Like, But Now I Do. Weird. And It Sorta Makes Sense.

This is a fascinating peek into why reading is so maddening for sufferers of dyslexia, along with a great new solution: a typeface that helps outwit dyslexia. Ha, take that, brain!Somewhere between 5% and 17% of readers have dyslexia, and some consider it one sign of a creative mind. But not being able to read due to dyslexia can be a real hardship, so if you know anyone with it, they’d probably love to see this. Your friends probably know someone, too.

I Never Got How Dyslexia Works Or What It Looks Like, But Now I Do. Weird. And It Sorta Makes Sense.

It seems that dyslexics see letter shapes in 3D. The fact that so many letters look alike because they're built out of the same bits sometimes makes the letters swap positions in dyslexic eyes. It's really easy for "pumps" to look like for "dumps" to them.


So doesn't it make sense for dyslexics to have their own typeface where letters don't look so alike?

Let's start with gravity. If dyslexics see things in three dimensions, how about we make letters bottom-heavy so it's easy to see which way they'd land?

And how about just making letters look a little more different from each other so dyslexic brains can tell right away that they're not the same?

The Dyslexie font does just this. And it works on all major computer platforms. And there's even a browser plug-in for reading on the web. So cool.

Living a simple and happy life, Chow Yun-fat plans to give his around $700 million fortune to charity, Hong Kong movie site Jayne Stars reported.

Chow Yun Fat was born in Lamma Island, Hong Kong, to a mother who was a cleaning lady and vegetable farmer, and a father who worked on a Shell Oil Company tanker. Chow grew up in a farming community, in a house with no electricity.

He would wake at dawn each morning to help his mother sell herbal jelly and Hakka tea-pudding on the streets; in the afternoons, he went to work in the fields.

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