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31 Days of Happiness Countdown: a new must-watch Christmas classic. (Day 20)

This star-studded video is guaranteed to bring a smile to your face.

31 Days of Happiness Countdown: a new must-watch Christmas classic. (Day 20)

Thanks for stopping by for Day 20 of Upworthy's 31 Days of Happiness Countdown! If this is your first visit, here's the gist: Each day between Dec. 1 and Dec. 31, we're sharing stories we hope will bring joy, smiles, and laughter into your life. It's been a challenging year, so why not end it on a high note? Check back tomorrow (or click the links at the bottom) for another installment!

Back in November, Sia released an absolutely joyful Christmas album with songs about puppies, kissing underneath the mistletoe, snowmen, and of course, Santa Claus. While the whole album is filled with the kind of music you'll want to listen to cuddled up on the couch with a cup of hot cocoa, it's really the video for one song in particular — "Santa's Coming for Us" — that makes the album a perfect winter treat.


The video stars Kristen Bell, Dax Shepard, Henry Winkler, Susan Lucci, and JB Smoove, as they dance around a house in preparation for a big holiday party with a majorly retro (in a great way) vibe.

GIFs from Sia/YouTube.

As Bell dances around the house, lip synching the song's lyrics, Shepard fumbles with the Christmas lights and rushes to get things ready for their guests, getting a bit of help from Winkler at one point.

There's food. There's singing. There's dancing. There's laughing. But most of all, the video brings a feeling of joy and nostalgia for warm winter memories with loved ones.

I really can't overstate how much you'll appreciate taking three-and-a-half minutes to watch this absolutely adorable video this holiday season. You'll be glad it's in your life. But don't just take it from me, check it out for yourself:

More days of happiness here: DAY 1 / DAY 2 / DAY 3 / DAY 4 / DAY 5 / DAY 6 / DAY 7 / DAY 8 / DAY 9 / DAY 10 / DAY 11 / DAY 12 / DAY 13 / DAY 14 / DAY 15 / DAY 16 / DAY 17 / DAY 18 / DAY 19 / [DAY 20] / DAY 21 / DAY 22 / DAY 23 / DAY 24 / DAY 25 / DAY 26 / DAY 27 / DAY 28 / DAY 29 / DAY 30 / DAY 31
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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

via Tom Ward / Instagram

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Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

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Since she's allergic to bees, she decided to stay put and see how badly her body would react. With some extra time on her hands, she decided to write something on her long-neglected Facebook page. It was September of 2019, and Representative Adam Schiff had just sent a letter to the Director of National Intelligence stating that the House knew there was a whistleblower complaint, the DNI wasn't handing it over, and that wasn't legal.

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Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

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