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When wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone, some unexpected species benefitted.

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Rocky Mountain Wolf Project

On a quiet hike in Yellowstone National Park, some lucky visitors might get to hear an amazing sound: the howl of a gray wolf.

A wolf howling in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. Image by Jim Peaco/YellowstoneNPS.

They might even get to spot one of these beautiful animals darting across the landscape. In fact, today, the chances of seeing a wolf in some parts of this park — such as Lamar Valley — are so good that some people come just to wolf-watch.


A female wolf standing in a road near the Lamar River Bridge in Yellowstone National Park. Image by Jim Peaco/YellowstoneNPS.

But for most of the 20th century, it was impossible to view these animals at all inside the park.

In fact, it was hard to see a gray wolf anywhere in the lower 48 states. That is because ever since settlers moved west, they feared the great gray wolf. The fact that wolves started killing livestock didn’t help either.

So, starting in the late 1800s up until the 1920s, wolves were hunted and poisoned by ranchers and predator control programs in order to protect people, livestock, and other “more desirable” wildlife species.  In the end, not a single breeding pair of wolves remained in Yellowstone National Park.

Soda Butte Creek in Yellowstone National Park in October 1993. Image by Jim Peaco/YellowstoneNPS.

When Yellowstone lost its wolves, it caused some big problems for the whole ecosystem.

Wolves are apex predators, which means they are at the top of the food web. When wolves were eliminated, it caused what scientists call a top-down trophic cascade. In other words, the whole ecosystem became unbalanced.

“Most ecosystems are best when they’re balanced,” Doug Smith, project leader for the Wolf Restoration Project in Yellowstone, said in a National Park Service Q&A. “Having a lot of different kinds of things at moderate numbers is better than having a lot of any one thing.”

Without wolves, there was a lot of one thing: elk. And biodiversity across the entire park declined as a result.

Two bull elk at Blacktail Deer Plateau. Image by Neal Herbert/YellowstoneNPS.

Why? Because without one of their major natural predators, fewer elk were dying. Their numbers grew so much that they ended up overgrazing large areas of land, leaving them vulnerable to erosion and defoliation.

This hurt plants and other animal species. Willow and aspen trees started dying off — and that hurt the species that relied on these trees for their survival, such as the birds that use them as nesting grounds and the beavers that use the wood to build dams and survive the winter.

The numbers of rabbits and mice species fell, too, because of all the overgrazing. They simply had fewer places to hide from predators.

Everything started to change after scientists reintroduced 41 wolves into Yellowstone National Park.

A newly arrived wolf is released from its cage into a pen in 1996. Image by Jim Peaco/YellowstoneNPS.

From 1995 to 1997, wolves were captured in Canada and northwest Montana and transported to Yellowstone. Once there, each was radio-collared and temporarily penned so biologists could make sure they were healthy.

Then they were released into the wilderness of the park.

Park rangers prepare to release a wolf into the park in 1996. image by Jim Peaco/YellowstoneNPS.

The wolves thrived in their new home.

The newly formed packs spread out and established their territories, and the large populations of elk and deer provided them with ample prey. And because they were inside the national park, the animals were protected from hunters. So their numbers grew.

The Gibbon wolf pack in Yellowstone National Park. Image via Yellowstone/NPS.

Before long, the wolves started changing Yellowstone’s ecosystem all over again, but this time for the better.

The first thing that happened was the number of large prey dropped. In 1995, Yellowstone was home to about 18,000 elk, but by 2015, that number had dropped to 4,500, helping restore the ecosystem's natural balance.

Elk on Mount Everts in Yellowstone National Park in 2014. Image by Neal Herbert/YellowstoneNPS.

Scientists think this happened, at least in part, because wolves started to change their prey’s behavior. Deer and elk started avoiding areas where they could be easily hunted, such as open valleys and gorges, which caused those areas to regenerate. Plants started growing on the riverbanks and erosion decreased, causing rivers and streams to actually change course.

Meanwhile, birds, beavers, mice, and bears started returning to those once-barren areas.

A western meadowlark in Lamar Valley in the spring of 2015. Image by Neal Herbert/YellowstoneNPS.

The landscape of the whole park transformed, and the ecosystem as a whole became healthier.  

A grizzly bear and her cub. Image by Jim Peaco/YellowstoneNPS.

Because they are carnivores, wolves often get a bad rap — but the Yellowstone story shows just how important they are to our planet.

The ecosystem in Yellowstone is complex and always changing, but recent history has shown scientists and ecologists how important wolves are to keeping the natural balance. It is true that wolves hunt large animals, but they are not just killers — they also help other species thrive.  

A wolf from the Canyon pack in Yellowstone. Image by Diane Renkin/NPS.

We all know the story about the “the big bad wolf.” But today, Yellowstone National Park is helping us learn a different story about wolves, and this is one is a lot happier.

Image from YouTube video.

An emotional and strong Matt Diaz.


Matt Diaz has worked extremely hard to lose 270 pounds over the past six years.

But his proudest moment came in March 2015 when he decided to film himself with his shirt off to prove an important point about body positivity and self-love.

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Family

Dad takes 7-week paternity leave after his second child is born and is stunned by the results

"These past seven weeks really opened up my eyes on how the household has actually ran, and 110% of that is because of my wife."

@ustheremingtons/TikTok

There's a lot to be gleaned from this.

Participating in paternity leave offers fathers so much more than an opportunity to bond with their new kids. It also allows them to help around the house and take on domestic responsibilities that many new mothers have to face alone…while also tending to a newborn.

All in all, it enables couples to handle the daunting new chapter as a team, making it less stressful on both parties. Or at least equally stressful on both parties. Democracy!

TikTok creator and dad Caleb Remington, from the popular account @ustheremingtons, confesses that for baby number one, he wasn’t able to take a “single day of paternity leave.”

This time around, for baby number two, Remington had the privilege of taking seven weeks off (to be clear—his employer offered four weeks, and he used an additional three weeks of PTO).

The time off changed Remington’s entire outlook on parenting, and his insights are something all parents could probably use.

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Family

Wife says husband's last name is so awful she can't give it to her kids. Is she right?

"I totally get we can’t shield kids from everything, and I understand the whole family ties thing, but c’mon."

A wife pleads with her husband to change their child's name.

Even though it’s 2023 and schools are much more concerned with protecting children from bullying than in the past, parents still have to be aware that kids will be kids, and having a child with a funny name is bound to cause them trouble.

A mother on Reddit is concerned that her future children will have the unfortunate last name of “Butt,” so she asked people on the namenerds forum to help her convince her husband to name their child something different.

(Note: We’re assuming that the person who wrote the post is a woman because their husband is interested in perpetuating the family name, and if it were a same-sex relationship, a husband probably wouldn’t automatically make that assumption.)

"My husband’s last name is Butt. Can someone please help me illuminate to him why this last name is less than ideal,” she asked the forum. “I totally get we can’t shield kids from everything and I understand the whole family ties thing, but c'mon. Am I being unreasonable by suggesting our future kid either take my name, a hybrid, or a new one altogether?"

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Christine Kesteloo has one big problem living on a cruise ship.

A lot of folks would love to trade lives with Christine Kesteloo. Her husband is the Chief Engineer on a cruise ship, so she gets to live on the boat pretty much for free as the “wife on board.” For Christine, life is a lot like living on a permanent vacation.

“I live on a cruise ship for half the year with my husband, and it's often as glamorous as it sounds,” she told Insider. “After all, I don't cook, clean, make my bed, do laundry or pay for food.“

Living an all-inclusive lifestyle seems like paradise, but it has some drawbacks. Having access to all-you-can-eat food all day long can really have an effect on one’s waistline. Kesteloo admits that living on a cruise ship takes a lot of self-discipline because the temptation is always right under her nose.

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Get the health benefits of Omega-3 without destroying ocean ecosystems

Calgee Sustainable Vegan Omega-3 is a cleaner, greener alternative to fish oil.

Over the last few decades Omega-3 supplements have become incredibly popular among health-conscious consumers, and it’s not hard to understand why. Omega-3 is a rich source of essential fatty acids, which have been linked to improvements in brain function, inflammation, chronic diseases, and overall wellness.

The only problem with Omega-3 is that most of it is derived from fish oil, and the mass production of fish oil is bad for the environment and your health. But it doesn’t have to be this way. With Calgee Sustainable Vegan Omega-3, you can get all the benefits of Omega-3 without the baggage. This eco-friendly alternative to fish oil is revolutionizing the wellness industry, promising a solution that benefits our planet as much as our health.

Why We Need Omega-3

Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), are superheroes in the world of nutrients, wielding powerful benefits for our brain, heart, and joints. Some researchers believe they play a role in maintaining cognitive functions like memory, focus, and mood, nourishing our mental health.

But that's not all. Omega-3s are heart heroes, too. They're known to reduce inflammation throughout the body, lower blood pressure, and improve cardiovascular health, keeping our hearts pumping strong. For anyone looking to ease joint pain or reduce the risk of heart disease, adding a dose of Omega-3 to the diet is a no-brainer.

The Problem With Fish Oil

Unfortunately, while Omega-3 may be great for you, it’s bad for the planet when made from fish oil. As the industry stands right now, about 50 fish are killed to produce just one bottle of traditional Omega-3 supplements. This overfishing is stripping our oceans of vital species and disrupting marine ecosystems. It's a domino effect that impacts not just the fish but the entire aquatic food chain.

Then there's the issue of contamination. Fish oil is derived from fish liver, which is the organ responsible for filtering out toxic chemicals. As a result, responsibly produced fish oil can contain harmful levels of mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides—so in other words, they may pose more health risks than benefits. What we need is a plant-based solution that bypasses these environmental and health hazards. And that’s exactly what Calgee set out to do.

Calgee Sustainable Vegan Omega-3

Calgee flips the script on Omega-3 production by ditching fish entirely. Instead, they get their Omega-3 from the same place fish get it from—namely, algae. This innovative approach harnesses the power of these tiny plants, which produce EPA and DHA in abundance, without the environmental toll of fishing. By cultivating algae in controlled, sustainable environments, Calgee ensures a consistent, contaminant-free product. This method not only spares our oceans but also provides us with a purer form of Omega-3, making it a win-win for health enthusiasts and the planet alike.

Choosing Calgee Sustainable Vegan Omega-3 means embracing a future where our health supplements work in harmony with the environment. And this is more than just talk. Calgee is a member of 1% for the Planet, an innovative global nonprofit made up of ethical businesses that donate 1% of their revenue to environmental organizations working toward innovative new solutions. This is environmentalism in action.

The Science Behind Calgee Omega-3

Scientific studies show that algae-based Omega-3s are just as rich in EPA and DHA as their fish-derived counterparts, and thus just as effective in supporting health and wellness. On top of that, Calgee's vegan Omega-3 formulation is engineered for optimal absorption, ensuring that the body can readily utilize these essential fatty acids. All of their products are made in a FDA certified cGMP facility in the USA, and they employ third party lab testing to maintain quality, potency and ensure our product is free from major allergens.

This science-backed approach underscores Calgee's commitment to delivering a health supplement that doesn't compromise on efficacy. By leveraging cutting-edge research and technology, Calgee ensures that their vegan Omega-3 supplement provides all the benefits you'd expect from traditional fish oil, but in a cleaner, more sustainable form. It's a testament to the power of innovation in creating health solutions that are good for people and the planet.

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Choosing Calgee Sustainable Vegan Omega-3 means embracing a lifestyle that values both personal health and the planet's well-being. By opting for this algae-based supplement, you're not just nourishing your body with essential Omega-3 fatty acids but also supporting a more sustainable, environmentally friendly approach to wellness. It's a small but powerful step towards a healthier you and a healthier world.

Ready to take another step toward a healthier, sustainable future? Click here to buy, and use coupon code 10UPWORTHY until 3/11/24 to get 10 percent off your purchase at checkout.

Community

Man uses social media to teach others ASL so kids don't experience what he did as a child

Every child should be able to communicate in a way that works best for them.

Man teaches people ASL so no child experiences what he did

People start communicating from the moment they enter the world usually through cries, faces, grunts and squeals. Once infants move into the toddler phase the combine all of their previous communication skills with pointing and saying a few frequently used words like "milk," "mama," "dada" and "eat."

Children who are born without the ability to hear often still go through those same stages with the exception of their frequently used words being in sign language. But not all hearing parents know sign language, which can stunt the language skills of their non-hearing child. Ronnie McKenzie is an American Sign Language advocate that uses social media to teach others how to sign so deaf and nonverbal kids don't feel left out.

"But seriously i felt so isolated 50% of my life especially being outside of school i had NONE to sign ASL with. Imagine being restricted from your own language," McKenzie writes in his caption.

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