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She once called the cops on a fellow parent. Here's why she wishes she hadn't.

"I feel like we have become a culture who watches for faults, instead of opportunities to help."

This article originally appeared on 12.14.17


Years ago, Megan Burnside saw a mother physically struggling with her son. The boy was screaming ... so she called the cops.

The mother, it seemed, was trying to get her 10-year-old son back in the car, and it looked like things were getting physical. Concerned for the kid, Burnside decided to call the police. Then she and her husband left.

When the police called her later to update her on the situation, she was horrified: The boy had autism, they told her, and was known to sometimes lash out physically. The mother was just doing her best to calm him down, as she had many times before.

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Image from @anastasiaelsinger on TikTok.

One DoorDash customer just received a roast beef sandwich with a side of justice.

"I know I'm not who you're expecting, but your driver got arrested," Sioux Falls police officer Sam Buhr (identified by Facebook group Tea Storm Chasers) told customer Anastasia Elsinger as he dutifully handed over her Arby’s order.

Officer Buhr, all smiles, offered a simple “take care,” and a friendly wave before leaving. Now that’s some high quality public service.

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Washington State Patrol officer gives final sign-off at state vaccine mandate deadline.

In Washington state, the vaccine mandate deadline—after which state employees who declined to get vaccinated for COVID-19 would be let go—arrived on October 18. There have been some high-profile holdouts in the state with the mandate, including the Washington State University (WSU) football head coach who was ousted this week from his $3.1 million-a-year position over his refusal to get the vaccine. And though many have gone ahead and gotten the shots, a handful of state employees have stood their ground on principle, choosing to give up their careers rather than comply with a government mandate in a public health emergency.

One of those employees is this Washington State Patrol officer who shared a video of his final sign-off on the mandate deadline. What I find interesting about this particular video is that he's so calm and reasonable sounding. He's not spouting conspiracy theories. He's not cussing out the governor. He's not ranting about tyranny. He's simply stating that he's taking "a moral stand for medical freedom and personal choice" and sharing words of thanks and encouragement to his fellow officers. His seemingly sane sincerity is almost enough to make me sympathetic.

And yet, ironically, everything he says makes it clear that his refusal of the vaccine makes zero sense.

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4-year-old New Zealand boy and police share toys.

Sometimes the adorableness of small children is almost too much to take.

According to the New Zealand Police, a 4-year-old called the country's emergency number to report that he had some toys for them—and that's only the first cute thing to happen in this story.

After calling 111 (the New Zealand equivalent to 911), the preschooler told the "police lady" who answered the call that he had some toys for her. "Come over and see them!" he said to her.

The dispatcher asked where he was, and then the boy's father picked up. He explained that the kids' mother was sick and the boy had made the call while he was attending to the other child. After confirming that there was no emergency—all in a remarkably calm exchange—the call was ended. The whole conversation was so sweet and innocent.

But then it went to another level of wholesome. The dispatcher put out a call to the police units asking if anyone was available to go look at the 4-year-old's toys. And an officer responded in the affirmative as if this were a totally normal occurrence.

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