This waitress was just quietly doing the right thing. A viral pic rewarded her in the best way.

Evoni Williams says she was just doing her job. But what she did made a lot of people take notice.

78-year-old diner Adrien Charpentier needed a little help cutting up his breakfast at a Texas Waffle House restaurant. Williams could have simply ignored his situation. Instead, she quietly took charge and helped him enjoy his meal without calling attention to herself.

However, fellow diner Laura Wolf was paying attention and snapped a photo of the interaction. Wolf posted the photo on Facebook, where it quickly went viral.


"This may seem small but to him, I'm sure it was huge," she wrote. "I'm thankful to have seen this act of kindness and caring at the start of my day while everything in this world seems so negative."

Photo: Laura Wolf

Williams had been saving money so she could eventually attend college. But her wait was suddenly over.

Williams had been working full-time at Waffle House since last year, steadily saving money for college since graduating high school and planning to study business management. After the Facebook photo went viral, the local mayor of her town dedicated March 8, 2018, in her honor.

"This is probably more of a lifestyle of Evoni," Mayor Bobby Hocking said. "Because she does this from her heart. It just so happens somebody got a picture of this one time of many."

And then something even more incredible happened: Texas Southern University offered her a $16,000 scholarship along with the aid of a counselor to help her enroll at the university.

Her combination of customer service and compassion struck a chord.

We all have stories about bad customer service. That's part of why someone so selflessly going out of their way to help a customer resonates on an emotional level. Wolf's photo at the time of this post has already been shared more than 54,000 times across Facebook.

It also doesn't hurt that Williams so clearly made a difference in the day of Charpentier, a stranger she could have simply passed by while going about her work.

Seemingly anonymous acts often reveal everything about our character.

When interviewed about it, she simply explained the act as "something I would do any other day." It's easy enough to look good when we know the cameras are on and the world is watching. But volunteering our time and energy to help out a stranger when there's nothing to gain or prove is truly an admirable act, even in the seemingly smallest of moments.

The outpouring of support Williams got on social media has directly led to her life potentially being changed in a meaningful way. And that makes an already inspiring story into something much bigger and better.

Courtesy of Movemeant Foundation

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Have you ever woken up one day and wondered if you were destined to do more in your life? Or worried you didn't take that shot at your dream?

FOX's new show "The Big Leap." is here to show you that all you need to take that second chance is the confidence to do so.

Watch as a group of diverse underdogs from all different walks of life try to change their lives by auditioning for a reality TV dance show, finding themselves on an emotional journey when suddenly thrust into the spotlight. And they're not letting the fact that they don't have the traditional dancer body type, age, or background hold them back.

Unfortunately, far too many people lack this kind of confidence. That's why FOX is partnering with the Movemeant Foundation, an organization whose whole mission is to teach women and girls that fitness and physical movement is essential to helping them develop self-confidence, resilience, and commitment with communities of like-minded girls.

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One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

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Norton

This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

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