Texas Roadhouse CEO giving up his salary and bonus to pay workers during coronavirus outbreak

There are so many things we're missing in this coronavirus pandemic. First dates, family reunions, heck even the mundane routine of heading into the office. Times of crisis change the world and as we're learning in real time, often reveal a lot about people's true nature.

The sad and disappointing stories continue to dominate the headlines and that's understandable when there's so much bad news going around the world right now and right here at home. But there are stories of selfless and inspiring behavior happening every day. And sometimes they come from a delicious steakhouse chain.


Texas Roadhouse CEO Kent Taylor announced on Thursday that he is forgoing the rest of his 2020 salary and bonus and instead directing the funds toward paying his employees during the coronavirus outbreak. The remaining salary and bonus both amount to $525,000 each for a total of $1,050,000.

"Kent Taylor has always said that Texas Roadhouse is a People-company that just happens to serve great steaks. His donation of his salary and bonus to help employees is the embodiment of that saying," a Texas Roadhouse spokesperson told The Hill. "We are blessed to have his leadership."

The spokesperson also told The Hill that Taylor has already donated $5 million of his personal funds to Andy's Outreach, a non-profit run by Texas Roadhouse to help employees in times of need.

Taylor's charitable move has been earning his all kinds of praise online. As one commenter on Reddit put it:

"I've always loved the Texas Roadhouse for steaks, now I love them for more than just that. Kent you're a hero, thank you!"


Photo by Enrique Macias on images.unsplash.com


Like so many of America's restaurants, Texas Roadhouse is staying open during the coronavirus, trying to find a way to make things work while also providing a valuable service to people who need food, can't get to grocery stores or simply need a break with some comfort food delivered to their front door. The 500 store chain is offering delivery and curbside service. However, as with most restaurants nationwide, there's little doubt that the demand for delivery and takeout is keeping pace with the normal amount of business done when the restaurant is fully open for business. Still, whatever income that is coming in makes a world of difference for companies like Texas Roadhouse, and more importantly, for the people they are able to keep on their payrolls.

"We are open for business and still serving America even though many of our dining rooms are temporarily closed," Taylor said in statement pinned to the top of his company's website. "As the President and other officials have stated, restaurants play a vital role in our nation's food supply, and we are going to help fill the gap where and how we can."

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon