When my wife returned to work after parental leave, I took my first trip to the grocery with two kids.

Little did I know I would return home feeling like a hero.

On a Monday morning, I pushed the green cart with flame decals through the second set of sliding doors and toward the deli. My 3-year-old son was strapped in the seat and my 3-month-old son was wrapped against my chest.

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Lady Gaga has been crushing the game for over a decade, but a lot of the public is still catching up. The roaring success of "A Star Is Born" only multiplied Gaga's star power and now a whole new bevy of fans are discovering how outspoken she's been all this time.

As a female musician who writes her own music and is brazen about her own sexuality and politics, Gaga is no stranger to industry sexism and also no stranger to shutting it down on sight.

Last year, when Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford testified against Brett Kavanaugh, Gaga shared stirring words of solidarity during an appearance on "Late Night with Stephen Colbert."

In the viral clip, she emphasized just how brave it was for Blasey-Ford to come forward, and noted how trauma can deeply affect your process of recollection.


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Some people apparently don't understand just how unbelievably good Serena Williams is on the tennis court.

Why they don't understand this is unclear. She holds more open era Grand Slam titles than any other tennis player, male or female. She's set Olympic records, ranking records, age records, prize money earnings records—the woman is a record-breaking machine. (Fun fact: Williams is the highest paid female athlete of all time, having earned $86 million in prize money during her career. The next highest is Maria Sharipova, with $38 million in prize money. If that's not total dominance, I don't know what is.)

Her list of tennis championships is a mile long. You don't even have to follow tennis to know that Serena Williams is a freaking powerhouse of a tennis player, not to mention one of the greatest athletes of all time.

And yet, there are dudes who believe they could take her on.

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12-year-old Julianne Speyer was attending a Fourth of July parade in Chesterland, Ohio, when something caught her ear.

Speyer heard a parade announcer introduce the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts in very different — and sexist — ways. The young resident of nearby Russell Township then described the experience in a letter published on July 19 in the Geauga County Maple Leaf newspaper.

"My name is Julianne Speyer," her letter began. "I am 12 years old and I would like to inform you of how offended and disappointed I am by the announcer of the Chesterland 4th of July parade's comment about the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts."

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