+
A 2010 clip of Gordon Ramsay sexually harassing Sofia Vergara is going viral.

It's been about one full year since men discovered women were people.

Since then, major improvements have been made to the way men are expected to treat women both in the workplace and in their personal lives. It also means that people in the public eye are having to confront past behavior that would never fly today.

The latest display of shameless sexism comes from celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay. While Ramsay became famous for his brazen personality and unchecked anger, a 2010 interview with Jay Leno and Sofía Vergara went too far.


The clip, which resurfaced on Twitter, shows Vergara shouting in Spanish that Ramsay is disrespecting her while swatting Ramsay's persistent hands away from her body.

In the full video, Leno piles on by asking Vergara how much weight she gained, drools over a photo of her in a bikini, criticizes the female director of his show, and does a whole lot of nothing to remedy Vergara's discomfort. While she tries her best to play along and laugh with all of it, it's clear this isn't the way she would like to be interviewed.

The full clip can be seen here and the interview begins at 1:30.

Note that Ramsay takes absolutely no time to mention Vergara in the bedroom before commenting on how she would "knock herself out" running.

This isn't the first time Ramsay has had to apologize for being degrading to women. A year before the Vergara interview, he insulated Tracy Grimshaw, an Australian TV reporter.

While at a food fair, he showed the audience a photo of a naked woman with a pig's face and said it was a photo of Grimshaw.

"I'd just like to take this opportunity to apologize for my stupid comments," Ramsay told the Nine Network. "I'm mortified that the whole thing has gone this far, my apologies.

Here's how people reacted to the resurfaced clip.

Sofía, you're a class act. Gordon, we all hope you've grown up in the last nine years.

This article is an updated version of a previously published post from our partners at Someecards by Kimberly Dinaro.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less

RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


Keep ReadingShow less